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Anne Reed

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Anne Reed became the Executive Director of the Wisconsin Humane Society in January of 2010. Before joining WHS, Anne spent almost three decades as a corporate litigator at the Milwaukee law firm of Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren SC.

At the Wisconsin Humane Society (WHS), Anne stepped into the leadership of Wisconsin's oldest, largest and most recognized animal welfare organization. For more than 130 years, WHS has been saving the lives of animals in need, and carrying out its mission to build a community where people value animals and treat them with respect and kindness. WHS helped to pioneer the idea that every animal available for adoption in a shelter could be free of time limits, taking as long as needed to be adopted. WHS operates shelters in Milwaukee, Saukville and Racine.

Anne serves on the board of directors of the National Federation of Humane Societies (NFHS), Wisconsin Federated Humane Societies, and Shelter Animals Count, a national database initiative. She also chairs NFHS's 2020 Vision Initiative. Anne also served as president of Meta House's board of directors from 2005 to 2007 and served on the board from 2001 to 2010. As a lawyer, she was named one of the Wisconsin Law Journal's "Women In The Law;" was named to the list of "Wisconsin Superlawyers," and authored a law blog which was twice named one of the 100 best in the country by the American Bar Association's ABA Journal.



Recent Articles
 
 Kids & Family - October 8, 2013
 Our temporary kitten
 My family is fostering a shelter kitten named Teddy. Talk about a win-win.
 
 Milwaukee Buzz - May 14, 2013
 Warbler time
 I worked in a Downtown office building for many years. Times would come - I never kept track of the time of year - when we would find beautiful little birds dead on the sidewalk every day for a few weeks. I always wondered what was happening, but kept forgetting to look it up. What were those birds?
 
 Kids & Family - April 24, 2013
 Taking the risk
 "I'd like to have an animal, but I don't want to be sad when it dies." I hear this more often than you might imagine. When they talk to me, people often start sentences with, "I'd love to have an animal, but ..." I listen closely to what comes next. To save a lot of homeless animals' lives, we need to inspire a lot of people to have animals. Every time I hear, "I travel," "I'm allergic," "My cat wouldn't like it," and so on, it helps us plan better ways to find families who can make a place for a homeless animal.
 
 Milwaukee Buzz - April 8, 2013
 An important meeting to save dogs
 Ever heard of Wisconsin's Conservation Congress? If not, you're not alone. But you can make a difference for dogs if you attend a Conservation Congress meeting tonight, April 8, in your county.
 
 Kids & Family - March 29, 2013
 If you want the dog of your dreams, get a grown-up dog
 Puppies. They sure are cute. But one major reason people get a puppy is completely mistaken. I said it once. You might have said it. You have friends who have said it. "I want a puppy so I can raise it to be exactly the dog I want."
 
 Kids & Family - March 20, 2013
 Tie a yellow ribbon 'round that shy dog's leash
 Some dogs are fine when people and other dogs walk, or run, up to them. Some dogs are fine ... as long as they're left alone. The "Yellow Dog Project" is an effort to help those dogs.
 
 Kids & Family - March 4, 2013
 Positive training works, negative training doesn't; tell your friends
 Sometimes new ideas spread quickly.  Sometimes they take forever.  Here's one I'd like to speed up. For decades, the accepted approach to training dogs was "dominance theory." But negative training doesn't work for most people; it always makes dogs sad and often makes behavior worse; and it ruins the friendship that was the reason you got a dog in the first place.
 
 Living - February 25, 2013
 To save animals, you have to like people
 "Boy, I hate people."  I hear that all the time from people who work in animal welfare. I disagree. I understand why they feel that way. When you do this work, you hear stories all the time that make you angry. Abuse and neglect. Domestic violence. Well-meaning stupidity. Even the simple failure to stick with commitments: "I'm moving out of town, so I need to surrender my 12-year-old dog." These stories would make anyone mad, let alone someone who cares enough about animals to have chosen shelter work over other, almost certainly better-paying, options.
 
 Milwaukee Buzz - February 18, 2013
 Not an ending - a beginning
 In animal sheltering work, it's easy to think of each adoption as a "happy ending" to that animal's story. That's one way to think about it - but it's just as true to think of it as a "happy beginning." The love that begins between a person and an animal when they leave our shelter often lasts for many years. It doesn't just save the animal's life; it shapes the person's life, forever.
 
 Living - February 11, 2013
 Hello from the Wisconsin Humane Society:  It's not what you think
 Hello and welcome to a new blog!  I've been the executive director of the Wisconsin Humane Society for just over three years, and I'm excited to share stories and reports of our work here. 
 


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