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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014

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Is it canceled or cancelled?


I DVRed the best show (well, it's my favorite show at least) on network television, "Studio 60" last night and sat down to watch it at about 9:30 p.m. Happily halfway into the live broadcast (the show airs at 9 p.m.), I thought I could safely avoid the ads and have a pleasant viewing experience. Not.

Channel 4 decided to frame out much of the program with school closings, weather advisories and other "breaking" news. Now I certainly realize that cold weather can be harmful and people must know about closings, but did the ticker really have to run for the entire program and as such a large image?

But the real point of this blog is this -- if a local news station is going to air cancellations all night at least spell the word "canceled" correctly. Every other listing/closing spelled the word differently. This school was canceled and the next was cancelled. What is it, one l or two?

According to the Associated Press (AP) Stylebook, the bible for editors and writers, the word is spelled with only one l. It's simply "canceled." And, before you scream and yell, canceled is American usage and cancelled is British, typically. I know that. You say colour, I say color. Get it? But still, choose one spelling and go with it. Why confuse and irritate us even more?

So, I ask the fine folks at local TV two things: please spell words correctly (or at least consistently) and if you must scroll cancellations please don't use the entire program duration and so much of my precious TV screen.

You've already forced many of us to view shows online. Keep this up and soon you'll be canceled!

Talkbacks

mez | April 14, 2009 at 3:14 p.m. (report)

Why do you push for them to use "canceled" the american version, but throughout your post you use the word cancellation (the british version) instead of cancelation? how come you don't use the american version across the board? i suggest that you too are guilty of not being consistent with the usage. At least you used the british version all the way through so i guess you've got that going for you. :)

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