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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

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In Milwaukee Buzz

Sunday Sound-off: What was the best or worst about moving to Milwaukee?


Moving to a new city requires a lot of adjustments. Suddenly, the most mundane activites become adventures, from where you go to buy a bagel to where you go to grab a cup of coffee. Whether you relocate to San Francisco or Sanibel Island, every new place has lots of new things to enjoy or to wish were different.

That said, this Sound-off reaches out to people who moved to Milwaukee from somewhere else. What was the biggest obstacle you encountered after moving to Brew City? Or, on the flip side, what was the most welcoming aspect of moving to The Mil?

Email us at soundoff@staff.onmilwaukee.com and if picked, we'll post your response next Sunday. Only submissions that include your full name and where you live will be considered.

Last week's question: What does Brew City still need?

Brew City needs to add a little more fun and competition to the leisure scene -- something other than a good game of bowling. Whirlyball, classic bumper cars with a twist, would be a great addition. Dave and Busters, a bar and arcade, would draw a crowd of game junkies. We do need to shake it up.
Cathy Kittell
Milwaukee


A contemporary art museum! Please!
Kim Weiss
Milwaukee


Milwaukee right now needs to have places that you wont find anywhere in the state to become a big city attraction. I believe Milwaukee needs a Downtown IKEA, upscale movie theater, ESPN Sportszone, and maybe an American Girl store. This would be a start, but then again, The House of Blues could've been a start also. No more malls. Instead, Milwaukee needs to have downtown shopping district like Michigan Avenue.
Walter Majewski
Milwaukee

I think Milwaukee (the region at large) needs an IKEA. Plain and simple.
Max Estes
Milwaukee

Talkbacks

ajknee | Feb. 3, 2007 at 11:27 a.m. (report)

I completely agree with everything atomhammer had to say. We need to stop trying to be every other city in America and strive to be something unique. Somewhere people will want to go for a different experience. Once that happens, we won't even need to try for the chain stores, rather we'll need to send them away. While I'm not against the idea of large chains coming to the area, I'd prefer that they stay outside the city so that we can keep our soul. An IKEA in Oconomowoc would be great, but a downtown location is an absolute ridiculous waste of space.

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atomhammer | Feb. 2, 2007 at 9:09 p.m. (report)

The LAST thing Milwaukee needs is more chain stores based in far away places, lending absolutely NO character or financial surplus to our once fair city. I'm so sick of all these Marquette yuppies pining away for more IKEAS and Eddie Bauer oases. Milwaukee has fallen a FAR way from its glory days. But our city is not lost by a long shot. We were once known around the world as the Workshop of the World. We also had the best, largest breweries, and a cream city brick that set our local architecture apart and established the rest of our industrial base. I think we should invest in our strengths and diversify from there. I propose we set up a Brewery College, where the universities, local micros and macros, and private investors jointly finance the establishment of a regional brewmaster college. We could put it somewhere in the valley. Maybe we could treat it like a UW-extension, the way we treat those design programs at UW-Stout. This would re-establish Milwaukee (and Wisconsin) once and for all as America's premiere brewing capital. I've noticed weve lost a lot of ground to Oregon lately. I also think its embarassing that a city with the superb industrial and manufacturing history of Milwaukee's calibre, still doesnt have a regional light rail system. We should start with a simple, linear commuter line connecting Ozaukee to Mitchell Field through the downtown area, with stops along UWM, the summerfest grounds, Bay View, and on to the airport. Nothing incredible, like a monorail. Just a simple north-south line like the one in Portland. We can add to it later, when it has finally started to pay for itself in twenty years or so. Finally, I propose that Milwaukee establish a greenbelt along the river. Its absolutely disgusting to see how all that development along Commerce Street is totally privatized, with virtually no public access to the water, except at distant, isolated, virtually hidden spots. I've also noticed that the housing there is almost 100% for yuppies, with no construction aimed at children, old people, or poor people. We are developing the city as if it was some sort of playground for twnetysomething pre-business majors. We should have some grad students and public planners study the canal systems in European cities like Utrecht and the Rhine cities, and maybe set up some simple walkway/bikepath along the river from UWM to the summerfest grounds. Wouldn't it be awesome if Milwaukeeans could catch one of those Paris-style river boats, and slowly cruise from a dock (Milwaukee beers in hand) near UWM, on down the river to summerfest? Perhaps we could set up stops along the way at the beautiful Lakefront Brewery, and that gorgeous little Marsupail park, with the open-air theater behind Trocadero's. By the way, that Marsupial park idea is one of the best kept secrets in this town. And finally, why not set up some sort of subsidy or municipal "encouragement" whereby the Prairie style is used for as much construction as possible? Wisconsin has its own indigenous architectural style, and we shouldnt take that for granted. Well, anyways, thats my two cents. Ya-ya Milwaukee. Forward!

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hank | Jan. 25, 2007 at 4:45 p.m. (report)

You know...I really do not understand this generation's obsession with play. Milwaukee used to work hard...a lot, and play simple...a little, and people seemed much more content 40 years ago. Too much leisure time and too many people being overpaid for producing nothing tangible has contributed to this pervasive penchant for pursuit of the next big leisure trend or fad. We've become a faded, jaded group of hedonists never satisfied for long with our current distractions. The majority of Milwaukee workers 40 years ago worked 6 days a week, had a Saturday night out with the spouse or pals and spent a quiet Sunday with the family after worship. Many would make fun of this scenario...call it backward or even repressive. I remain completely unconvinced that our current way of living is of greater benefit. If we don't engage in hard, productive, soul-satisfying work we certainly won't find any satisfaction, let alone contentment, in our play.

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yvonne8753 | Jan. 24, 2007 at 9:01 a.m. (report)

Thank you last poster for the comments on IKEA. I have no idea whay IKEA would make Milwaukee great. I have lived here most of my life and love the city. I walk just about everywhere and if I do go out of my area make it a point to park far and walk far. The east side, third ward and downtown and very very pedestrian friendly.

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MKEgrlatheart | Jan. 23, 2007 at 6:22 p.m. (report)

I am so saddened to see all of the comments! Multiple suggestions for an IKEA? What is wrong with you people? Look around you and realized the charm that Milwaukee has and learn to appreciate it! I have lived all over the country, but look forward each time I am able to make it back to my beloved hometown. In the past several years, the city has managed to improve its offerings and image while still retaining the things that make it truly and uniquely Milwaukee.

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