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Would you wear sweatpants to a nice restaurant? What about a concert?

Sunday Sound-off: Is it OK to wear sweatpants to nice restaurants?


This week during my Thursday morning chat with Kramp and Adler on 102.1, I mentioned that my 4-year-old son was in a "sweatpants" phase and -- since I am honoring his fashion choice -- it limits where we can eat for Easter brunch.

My situation reminds me of how often I see adults in nice restaurants wearing sweatpants or "Zubaz." (You know, those baggy, tiger-striped pants.) I don't know if this is a Milwaukee thing or a fashion phenomenon that happens in a lot of cities, but a lot of folks in this town wear their lounging duds to fancy events and I'm not sure what to think about this.

What are your thoughts?

Who cares? People should wear whatever makes them comfortable. If someone wants to wear sweatpants to The Pfister, that's their choice. Milwaukee is a working-class city, and because of this fact, it's very down-to-earth. People wearing sweats in public is a small price to pay for the lack of pretention in this city.

Put on a real pair of pants, please. Sweats are fine for running to the grocery store, but when you're going out for dinner at a nice restaurant, have a little pride / class and wear something without an elastic waistband (unless one is medically required).

Talkbacks

HarleyRider | March 26, 2008 at 9:42 p.m. (report)

I am glad that the subject was brought up. I get tired of jeans and a t-shirt as the acceptable outfit just about anywhere. People wonder what I am up to when I put a sports coat on to a function. It would be nice if, as a collective group, we would put a little more effort into dressing better.

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Reader | March 26, 2008 at 3:54 p.m. (report)

Esquire says it best: "Sweatpants are for sick days, couch surfing, and light exercise. For anything else, throw on a pair of jeans and get on with it."

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Theadams | March 26, 2008 at 11:16 a.m. (report)

This says it all...from a Seinfeld episode: Jerry: "Again with the sweatpants?" George: "What? I'm comfortable." Jerry: "You know the message you're sending out to the world with these sweatpants? You're telling the world, 'I give up. I can't compete in normal society. I'm miserable, so I might as well be comfortable.'"

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sheila_d | March 25, 2008 at 1:50 p.m. (report)

Absolutely NOT!!! That's what is wrong with this city. Some people could care less how they look when they go out for dinner, be it a nice restaurant or a casual one. And many times over, they are the ones who complain about the service. Neatly dressed patrons receive better service! Try it sometime and I think u will agree. she-she

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wfbgal | March 25, 2008 at 11:37 a.m. (report)

Going through some old photos this weekend we found one of my son as a toddler in dress pants and his tye dyed blue shirt. My husband and I started remembering how we sat in our hotel room trying to get our son dressed for my sisters wedding. He was suppose to wear a white, button down dress shirt and his dress pants. He absolutely insisted on wearing his "blue shirt". I'm sure the blood curling screams could be heard out in the hotel hallway - he was screaming at the top of his lungs - I want to wear my blue shirt!. The fact of the matter is, he had to wear his dress shirt for the wedding and to the reception he could wear his blue shirt. I gotta tell you, it wasn't fun getting the white shirt on and my husband and I arrived in the nick of time to the wedding, stressed out and unhappy - but "darn it" he wore the nice shirt. Even now. On picture day, you wear a collared shirt. When we play golf we wear nice dress pants and collared shirts. When we go out for dinner, we dress approprately. Sometimes saying no to your child is a good thing. They also need boundries - otherwise when they get to school they are not going to follow the rules and as hard as it was to get rid of the passifier, it is going to be harder to correct the "not following the rules" behaviour in school. Sometimes on Principle, you have to say no. I hope you appreciate my honest answer.

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