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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Tue
Hi: 91
Lo: 62
Wed
Hi: 70
Lo: 54
Thu
Hi: 72
Lo: 58
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I doubt Suzuki CEO Osamu Suzuki will be rubbing elbows with the hog enthusiasts this week.
I doubt Suzuki CEO Osamu Suzuki will be rubbing elbows with the hog enthusiasts this week. (Photo: shutterstock.com)

6 things you won't see at Harley's 110th

Dave Grohl, Joan Jett, Ponch ... the unexpected celebrity sightings are all over social media this weekend at Harley-Davidson's 110th anniversary bash is in full swing in Milwaukee. But there are some folks that are likely to steer clear.

1. Jimmy from "Quadrophenia"

As dedicated as the archetypal mod was to purple hearts, northern soul and rumbles in Brighton, Jimmy loved his Lambretta scooter best of all. I wouldn't expect him to be caught dead with a city full of rockers – real or self-styled. Anyway, he was last seen riding out by the cliffs of Dover in 1979, so who knows where he is.

2. Conan O'Brien

Speaking of rumbles, surely, Leno is expected in town. Unless Conan wants to duke it out, it's best he gives a wide berth.

3. Osamu Suzuki

If there's one place Suzuki CEO Osamu Suzuki might not feel especially welcome, it's in hog heaven.

4. Animal

Sure, he's the Muppet-most-likely-to-ride, but still, come on, he's a puppet, dudes.

5. Elsie

"Please don't make a pair of buttless chaps out of me."

6. Elton John

I'd venture to guess there's still a sour taste that lingers.

Teachers at Allen-Field Elementary are hard at work this week getting their building ready for students' return on Tuesday.
Teachers at Allen-Field Elementary are hard at work this week getting their building ready for students' return on Tuesday.
Allen-Field (the result of a merger between Walter Allen and Eugene Field Schools) serves more than 700 kids on the near South Side.
Allen-Field (the result of a merger between Walter Allen and Eugene Field Schools) serves more than 700 kids on the near South Side.
MPS facilites and Foundation Architects have created an attractive short-term solution to space issues at Maryland Avenue Montessori on the East Side.
MPS facilites and Foundation Architects have created an attractive short-term solution to space issues at Maryland Avenue Montessori on the East Side.
The two temporary classrooms do have a bit of a trailer-ish look on the playground side.
The two temporary classrooms do have a bit of a trailer-ish look on the playground side.

Getting ready for the new year: random notes on schools

Yesterday, I stopped at Allen-Field Elementary on Lapham Boulevard to drop off some school supplies that our friend Steve Palec, OnMilwaukee.com programmer Nick Barth and I had collected for kids at the K3-5 school with more than 700 pupils.

It was a hot day and the school was abuzz with activity as teachers and staff – who officially had to report the day before, but had in most cases already been in the building for weeks or days ahead of that – working to get their classrooms ready, hallways decorated, the library in order, etc.

And, yes, they all looked very professionally dressed, per the new district dress code. In describing it to me earlier this week, a teacher told me the rule of thumb for footwear is, "If you can wear it in the shower, you can't wear it to school."

Traditional-calendar Milwaukee Public Schools open on Tuesday, Sept. 3.

As soon as I walked into the office and asked for Rene Blazel, the first grade teacher I met via social media, Principal Marybell Nieves Harris came over to say an enthusiastic thank you for the modest collection of notebook paper, notebooks, colored pencils, crayons and a coveted box of 500 shiny new yellow pencils given to me by Palec.

Blazel gave me a tour and I met a dozen or more teachers who glistened a bit with the sweat of the day's work, but who – to a person – wore equally glistening smiles and the kind of first-day-of-school fire that keeps these folks going.

There are many challenges at Allen-Field this year but this is clearly a team that will rise to meet them.

Over at Maryland Avenue Montessori on the East Side, finishing touches are being put on two new temporary classrooms that have had all kinds of names over the years – portables, demountables, barracks and, egads, trailers. A century ago, barracks were erected at many schools – including Maryland Avenue (though on the opposite side of the building) – as the district attempted to keep up with growing enrollments. Some high schools, like Bay …

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Juniper Tar, with Jason Mohr in the center.
Juniper Tar, with Jason Mohr in the center. (Photo: CJ Foeckler)

Fare thee well, Jason Mohr and Juniper Tar

Today I got an email from my old friend Jason Mohr, with whom I worked at Schwartz Bookshops and, briefly, at OnMilwaukee.com, announcing his departure from Milwaukee.

Mohr and his family are headed to Denver where Jason – who worked for a while at WMSE – took a position with Colorado Public Radio.

I asked Jason what the move means for the future of his band Juniper Tar, one of the best bands in Milwaukee. Consciously or not, he quoted George Harrison ...

"All things must pass."

And he added that it looks like Juniper Tar's Sept. 21 gig at Linneman's with Luray, will be the band's last, at least for a while.

"Good way to go out at Jimmy's house," Jason said.

We'll miss you, buddy.

The path around the Lannon quarry at Menomonee Park is a great walk.
The path around the Lannon quarry at Menomonee Park is a great walk.
The beach is a major draw, though it closed for the season this past weekend.
The beach is a major draw, though it closed for the season this past weekend.
Along the path, you'll find this ruin.
Along the path, you'll find this ruin.
In the ruins, there is little to see beyond this remnant.
In the ruins, there is little to see beyond this remnant.
Old quarries are, unsurprisingly, very deep. This spot has a bit of a ledge before it drops off.
Old quarries are, unsurprisingly, very deep. This spot has a bit of a ledge before it drops off.
A close-up of the ledge.
A close-up of the ledge.
A section of path is paved, naturally, with Lannon stone.
A section of path is paved, naturally, with Lannon stone.
The old stone crusher sits idle, as a reminder of the park's history as a quarry.
The old stone crusher sits idle, as a reminder of the park's history as a quarry.
Did I mention it's beautiful?
Did I mention it's beautiful?

Area parks boast quarry lakes that offer fun and history

I have long been a fan of the "lake" at Harrington Beach State Park. That's in quotes because really, the body of water is an old quarry that has filled with water.

The old Stonehaven quarry at Harrington Beach, up in Belgium, has a great, if precarious for little children, path encircling it and it makes for a peaceful walk. I also love that the foundations of some of the quarry-era buildings for workers have survived. A visit is fun and opens a window on Wisconsin and immigrant history.

Recently, I went to Menomonee Park for the first time and got a peek at Lannon Quarry, which is very similar to the one at Harrington Beach, except that this quarry lake, in addition to having a path around it, has a beach with swimming for families, a dog swimming area and you can even go scuba diving in it, which sounds cool.

On my visit, I took some photos of the old quarry lake, the beach, the old, idle stone crusher and the ruins of a building executed, as you'd expect, in Lannon stone, probably quarried right there on site.

The beach house has an amazing floor to ceiling fireplace made entirely of the local Lannon stone.

As a fan of Lannon stone, this quarry was really fun to visit.

Apparently Fox Brook Park – also a popular inland beach destination – is also a former quarry, but I haven't been out there to check it out yet.