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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Saturday, Oct. 25, 2014

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Arthur Ircink is the director and creator of "Wisconsin Foodie."
Arthur Ircink is the director and creator of "Wisconsin Foodie."

Five questions with Arthur Ircink

I met director and creator of "Wisconsin Foodie" Arthur Ircink several years ago and was fortunate enough to work with him in the first season of the show.

His approach to Wisconsin food, restaurants, farmers and local keepers of the "faith" was a completely fresh and new perspective. It's unique in the sense that the show is not funded by advertising dollars. Integrity and objectivity are paramount and that was obvious from the first episode.

I recently caught up with him to ask him about his ideas, inspirations and some recommendations.

OnMilwaukee.com: Compared to newspapers and radio, what is about films that interests you? And how did you get into films?

Arthur Ircink: It's hard to compare those different mediums; I grew up loving the movies and always wanted to be a part of that craft. Newspapers and radio are more objective. I like the subjectivity of film, letting the viewer interpret the story. To me, the best films are the ones that make you think and that is really the goal with Wisconsin Foodie, to make people think about their food choices. I don't look at Wisconsin Foodie as part of the "media;" in my mind each episode is a documentary film that explores a character's story relating to our culinary environment.

When I was a kid my father would take me to the movies every Friday. I found comfort in the theater. Growing up, movies became an escape for me, when the real world gave me a hard time I always knew I had an out. There was a point were I was exposed to different filmmakers like Herzog, the Maysles Brothers, Godard, Begman and Bunuel, [and] at that point I began to look at cinema as art and something I wanted to contribute to.

It can be very complicated to make a film – you need a crew, actors, money, a script, etc. In the early days it was a challenge for me to organize all of that, so I naturally turned to documentary filmmaking, which is something that can be done with a subject and a camera. In the end I am drawn to the storytelling a…

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