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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Monday, July 28, 2014

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Lindsay rockin' a 'stache.
Lindsay rockin' a 'stache.

Movember's mustaches - not just for men anymore?

I know, I’ve already blogged about Movember.

I’m a sucker for a gent with a good crop of facial hair any time of year, but with Movember in full swing, the bounty of beard and ‘stache displays are more than this furry-face-loving lady can handle. I can’t help it; I’m with Kesha on this one. "I like your beard."

And I know. I’ve already given you the obligatory mustache picture, but my hair-brained mind cannot help but wonder – are any chicks literally embracing Movember? Are there any women growing out their mustaches (gasp!) all November long?  

Apparently, there is one – as profiled by the Huffington Post.  

But, other than the thoroughly awesome Sarah O’Neill, and a few others before her – let’s be real.  

A plethora of women "struggle" with facial hair. (Please read the quotes around the word "struggle" aloud while partaking in the exaggerated finger gestures symbolizing quotes and accompany that with a strong throat clearing.) 

Female facial hair growth can be attributed to genetics or as in O’Neill’s case – hormonal issues like Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Waxing, laser, razor and depilatory industries can testify to the whacks, slices and flashes of light women will subject themselves to in order to be hair free.

(Razors are not a great option for female facial fur due to 5 o’clock shadow being considered a gender specific, non-sexy side effect of the blade. Shadow on Jon Hamm, Ryan Gosling or George Clooney – the consensus is pretty much – yum. Scruff on Cindy Crawford, Gisele or Raquel Welch – questionable.)

Movemeber celebrates the growing of facial hair all November long in support of creating awareness for men’s health issues. These issues include prostate and testicular cancer and mental illness, which reach beyond those directly affected. These are serious conditions that touch those close to the affected man (which includes men and women!) so, why shouldn’t everyone get in the spirit?

Although the Mov…

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Sookie road trips like a pro and so can you.
Sookie road trips like a pro and so can you.

How to road trip like a boss

After driving my 12-year-old front wheel drive SUV 2241 miles in three days through a nasty autumn storm system, I consider myself fit to give a bit of advice on how to road trip like a boss.

This was not my first ro(a)deo.  

I have done similar (in terms of mileage) car voyages six times before in pleasant summertime weather. Sometimes alone, thrice accompanied humans and always with a canine in tow.

This time I ventured out with the original "Beasto Blanco," Sookie (the big, white Boxer dog pictured) in the old Chevy Blazer packed to the gills with my must-have survival amenities. 

This road trip was a one-way venture and I’d be arriving to an empty locale that I’d basically be camping out in so, I needed the basics like a blow-up mattress, bedding, towels, cooking implements, cleaning supplies, clothing, toiletries, a foldable desk/chair, my houseplants and all of Sookie’s humungous must-haves including her 40-pound tub of food and luxurious bed.

Seeing as I survived my trip and arrived exactly where I supposed to, when I was supposed to, in spite of the weather trying to intervene, I’m going to give you some sage road trippin’ counsel – a lot of which I did not follow on this trip and/or learned the hard way.  

So, let me make the mistakes for you and heed the following:

1. Plan Ahead

  •  Map out your path manually and print it because your GPS may not work at all times.
  •  Check the weather. Oops – somehow I forgot to do this, so that storm was a big surprise.
  •  Set daily mileage goals and do your best to stick to them, but go OVER if you underestimated.  Doing 100 extra miles my first day turned out to save a lot of grief day two – where I lost two hours due to traveling east. I could tell around noon day one that I was ahead of schedule, so my husband researched a stop 100 miles further east than I had originally planned, canceled my existing hotel reservation and booked a pet-friendly hotel in the new destination.
  • Factor in time…
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