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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Friday, Aug. 29, 2014

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Lindsay, put down the scissors.
Lindsay, put down the scissors.

Someone please take the scissors out of my snip-happy hands

In my eternal battle of "Bangs or Botox," bangs won yet again after months of growing out my fringe through every stage of awkwardness. I seem to be in this eternal pattern of grow out / cut / push to the side / repeat. And more than rarely and quite dangerously, I am the one wielding the blade for these front-view revisions. 

The latest chop happened was while I was traveling. My bangs had finally gotten to the point where I could tuck them behind my ear – kind of the Holy Grail of patiently maturing a fringe. All it took was one "bad hair day" combined with a shadow cast across a rivet in my forehead and I started snipping.

I am sure you are wondering where I sourced scissors appropriate for trimming human strands while I was traveling, as hotel rooms are not typically equipped with barbering shears. I have that covered. I always travel with professional hair cutting tools and styling razor. Always. Because I never know when the urge to clip is going to hit me.

I am therefore a professional stylist’s nightmare due to this self-snipping tendency. My future stylists be warned; eventually I will altar any haircut I receive on my very own.

This behavior started very early. And my family took note of this. My paternal grandmother to this day will not allow me to have scissors. She took them away from me as a punishment when I was about 5 years old, after I transformed the loft in her condo into a hair salon. My first client was my little brother, who was just three years old at the time.

I played out the entire salon scenario, setting the scene for a true hair design experience. I greeted my brother with a big welcome as I had him crawl up the stairs to enter my den of beauty. I took his tiny hand and walked him around while I indicated the imaginary shampoo bowl and retail products. 

The overhead ceiling lights were off and the space was only dimly lit by the late-afternoon gray haze pouring in the windows from the cloudy, Wisconsin fall day. There was a s…

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Joseph Emanuele, president of the local chapter of The Order Sons of Italy in America.
Joseph Emanuele, president of the local chapter of The Order Sons of Italy in America.

Emanuele shares insight about Festa, The Order Sons of Italy

Festa Italiana is here!

The Milwaukee food, music and fireworks tradition where "everyone is Italian" kicked off Friday July 18. I had the opportunity to dive deeper into what Festa means for Italian-American culture when I asked Joseph Emanuele, president of The Order Sons of Italy in America: Filippo Mazzei Greater Milwaukee Lodge #2763, to discuss his organization and his favorite Festa moments.

Lindsay Garric: Please tell me about The Order Sons of Italy in America. What role does OSIA play in Festa Italiana?

Joseph Emanuele: The Order Sons of Italy in America (OSIA) is the oldest and largest Italian-American Fraternal Organization in the Country. It was founded in 1905 as a mutual aid group for immigrants. Today it consists of thousands of members throughout the nation and includes men, women and children, as we are a family-oriented organization.

OSIA's charitable causes are supported through volunteer endeavors. All benefits are given without regard to ethnic or racial group status. OSIA donates to foundations for the cure and prevention of Alzheimer's disease, Autism and Cooley's anemia.

The OSIA: Filippo Mazzei Greater Milwaukee Lodge #2763 was chartered in November of 2000, and became Milwaukee’s first lodge under the national organization. In 2008 Filippo Mazzei merged with the Grand Lodge of Illinois and became the Grand Lodge of Illinois / Wisconsin.

OSIA takes part in Festa Italiana as do many other local societies, volunteering its time to help the Italian Community Center with its festival activities. This year as in years past, OSIA members will be volunteering their time working a booth at Festa for the Italian Community Center.

LG: What do Festa Italiana and OSIA represent and mean to you as an Italian-American living in Milwaukee?

JE: OSIA represents and supports the preservation of the Italian heritage and culture, as does the Italian Community Center. Many Italians migrated to Milwaukee in the early 1900's, and a great deal of them di…

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Don't like your birth date? Pick a new one.
Don't like your birth date? Pick a new one.

How to change your birthday

Over the weekend, a friend posted a picture on social media that was taken at her birthday dinner with the caption "Birthday drinks with the birthday girls."

In the photo, I was seated at the forefront, snuggled into a curved booth and flanked by four lovelies. The occasion was in fact, in celebration of two beautiful birthday girls. However, I was not one of them. 

I was tagged in this photo on Facebook and it has resulted in yet another episode of "everything happens for a reason." 

I have made both a verbal and internal wish to change my birth date for the last few years. I am part of a little club of humans whose birthdays exist on or are close to calendar holidays or what could be considered, overshadowing events. 

There are the people who get a dual celebratory energy being born on Christmas or Fourth of July. A tinseled six-foot tree and fireworks to crown your special day are kind of a cherry on top of the birthday sundae. Decorations and entertainment that are a bonus "gift with purchase."

However, there is the diametric double-birthday, where a more somber holiday or event falls on or around your birthday. A festivity of being born coupled with a national tragedy or personal loss has an undertone that is hard to overcome, no matter how positive or optimistic the person is. 

I fall into the later category. My brother passed away just two days before my actual birthday. The glow from a thousand candles cannot fully illuminate the darkness of having the anniversary of his departure so close to the celebration of my arrival.

September, the month that once brought the beauty of changing leaves and the anticipation of "doing something special for my birthday," now ushers clouds of memories that are difficult to escape no matter how many years pass or how hopeful the affirmations.

While I have never been one to throw a big celebration in honor of myself, this duality has forever changed the tone for a day that is supposed to be full of confetti and ca…

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Gretchen and the Pickpockets is a family affair.
Gretchen and the Pickpockets is a family affair.

Gretchen and the Pickpockets on tap at Jazz Estate

Tossing the van keys in the trash at a truck stop in the middle of nowhere is just one of the notches in the "first national tour" belt of Gretchen and the Pickpockets. While it may not be the typical tour debauchery of bygone days, it’s just one anecdote this band is collecting along the way.

The Jazz Estate will host the up and coming group on Thursday, July 3 at 9:30 p.m. The band was chosen as New England’s no. 1 best new band by the Hard Rock Café’s Battle of the Bands. Its unique blend of rock, pop, jazz and Motown will provide a Summerfest alternative for those looking for a musical option outside of the Big Gig.

Wallet chains can safely be removed. Vocalist Gretchen Klempa and her bassist brother, Mike, hail from Pick Pocket Woods, N.H., hence the group’s name. They both attended the University of New Hampshire where they met and formed the rest of the group two years ago. 

The sibling element doesn’t necessarily make for a Partridge Family experience on the road. Guitarist Richie Smith had a messy run in with some dog waste departing from his house to the tour van, but the band sees these sorts of little mishaps as "a good omen."

According to Matt Turner, manager of The Jazz Estate, audiences can expect to be wowed by the show, which is in support of the Pickpockets' recently released self-titled debut LP, out now.

Turner continues, "We are excited to be adding to the music in Milwaukee during Summerfest time! It's also our weekly "Jazz In The Dark" Thursdays, partnering with Lakefront Brewery, so the first 15 paid get a free Riverwest Stein."

The band has become accustomed to packed houses in venues both big and small but they are especially looking forward to the intimate environment The Jazz Estate offers because, "engaging and connecting with the crowd lets us give a unique, energetic and memorable performance every time we play."

The tour will be the band’s premiere beyond the borders of New England. Mike Klempa says they are especia…

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