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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Friday, Aug. 29, 2014

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The Urban Ecology Center's award-winning "green" building houses the main offices, resource areas and classrooms.
The Urban Ecology Center's award-winning "green" building houses the main offices, resource areas and classrooms.

Day 10 reveal: Postcards from Milwaukee

Inspired by the urban street photography featured in "Street Seen: The Psychological Gesture in American Photography 1940-1959" at the Milwaukee Art Museum, I've shared a snapshot of a Milwaukee landmark each day for the 10 days leading up to the "MAM After Dark" last night. Hopefully, you made it to "MAM After Dark" last night! Good luck on your last photo!

Yesterday's photo: Urban Ecology Center

If you've wandered your way through Riverside Park, you'd know this Milwaukee wonder. Housing the Urban Ecology Center, 1500 E. Park Pl., and dedicated to all things green, this building was designed by Kubala Washatko Architects.  The four-story, metal-sided, timber-frame building dons large porches and a rooftop photovoltaic array. 

This award-winning "green" building houses the main offices, resource areas and classrooms. 

Want to participate in today's photo? Taken from unique angles, your task is to figure out which iconic Milwaukee building is in the photograph. The pictures will start out easy but get progressively more challenging, so submit your best guess and check back daily to find yesterday's reveal. Ready to start? Just click here.

Click below to receive a coupon for $2 off admission to the Milwaukee Art Museum. Participate and you will be entered to win a prize pack featuring two free tickets to the Milwaukee Art Museum and a $50 gift card to Ward's House of Prime. The more you participate, the better chance you have to win.

"Street Seen," on view through April 25, examines post-World War II street photography in New York and offers an unforgettable look into a pivotal moment in our history. For more information, visit mam.org/streetseen.

Read more...
Villa Terrace's backyard runs down the hill to Lincoln Memorial Drive.
Villa Terrace's backyard runs down the hill to Lincoln Memorial Drive.

Day nine reveal: Postcards from Milwaukee

Inspired by the urban street photography featured in "Street Seen: The Psychological Gesture in American Photography 1940-1959" at the Milwaukee Art Museum, I will share a snapshot of a Milwaukee landmark each day for the 10 days leading up to "MAM After Dark"on March 12.

Yesterday's photo: Villa Terrace Arts Museum

The Villa Terrace, 2220 N. Terrace Ave., was originally the home of Lloyd Smith of A.O. Smith Corporation. Built in 1927 by David Adler, the villa houses 15th to 18th century decorative arts.

The building is made of whitewashed, warm-pink brick and limestone that was quarried and carved in Italy. In the center courtyard, there is a sculpture of Hermes, messenger of the Gods, surrounded by a mosaic of black and white pebbles from Lake Michigan.

Especially interesting is the waterfall that runs down the staircase to the garden below. It was based on one at a villa in Italy.

Want to participate in today's photo? Taken from unique angles, your task is to figure out which iconic Milwaukee building is in the photograph. The pictures will start out easy but get progressively more challenging, so submit your best guess and check back daily to find yesterday's reveal. Ready to start? Just click here.

Click below to receive a coupon for $2 off admission to the Milwaukee Art Museum. Participate and you will be entered to win a prize pack featuring two free tickets to the Milwaukee Art Museum, two tickets to the "MAM After Dark" event March 12 and a $50 gift card to Ward's House of Prime. The more you participate, the better chance you have to win.

"Street Seen," on view through April 25, examines post-World War II street photography in New York and offers an unforgettable look into a pivotal moment in our history. For more information, visit mam.org/streetseen.

Read more...
Want to participate in today's photo? Taken from unique angles, your task is to figure out which iconic Milwaukee building is in the photograph.
Want to participate in today's photo? Taken from unique angles, your task is to figure out which iconic Milwaukee building is in the photograph.

Day eight reveal: Postcards from Milwaukee

Inspired by the urban street photography featured in "Street Seen: The Psychological Gesture in American Photography 1940-1959" at the Milwaukee Art Museum, I will share a snapshot of a Milwaukee landmark each day for the 10 days leading up to "MAM After Dark"on March 12.

Yesterday's photo: The Grain Exchange or The Mitchell Building

Built in 1879, the Grain Exchange building, 225 E. Michigan St., is best known today for its large ballroom that serves as a wedding venue.

But at one time, it served as the hub of Wisconsin's grain market. Between 1950 and 1970, wheat was the area's chief product and it was in this building, that trading and inspecting took place.

Want to participate in today's photo? Taken from unique angles, your task is to figure out which iconic Milwaukee building is in the photograph. The pictures will start out easy but get progressively more challenging, so submit your best guess and check back daily to find yesterday's reveal. Ready to start? Just click here.

Click below to receive a coupon for $2 off admission to the Milwaukee Art Museum. Participate and you will be entered to win a prize pack featuring two free tickets to the Milwaukee Art Museum, two tickets to the "MAM After Dark" event on March 12 and a $50 gift card to Ward's House of Prime. The more you participate, the better chance you have to win.

"Street Seen," on view through April 25, examines post-World War II street photography in New York and offers an unforgettable look into a pivotal moment in our history. For more information, visit mam.org/streetseen.

Read more...
One dollar provides a child with clean water for 40 days.
One dollar provides a child with clean water for 40 days.

Diners pour into The Tap Project

During World Water Week, March 21-27, a dollar will make the ultimate difference.

The Tap Project, an extension of UNICEF, comes to several Milwaukee restaurants the entire week with the goal of generating funds to guarantee clean water to those in need.

"We decided to bring the Tap Project to Milwaukee because we thought, given our proximity to Lake Michigan, people might not realize the extent of the clean drinking water problem in the rest of the world.  Every day, 4,100 children throughout the world die from water-related diseases.  We viewed it as an opportunity to educate people as well as give them an opportunity to help out," volunteer Pat Ringsred said.

The Tap Project started in New York City in 2007 and has since held events all over the country. The concept is simple: customers at area restaurants are asked to donate $1 for water that is typically served for free. This dollar provides a child with clean drinking water for 40 days.

From March 21 to 27, diners are encouraged to make a $1 donation at participating restaurants including Cafe Centraal, Cafe Hollander locations in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, County Clare, The Wicked Hop, Lucky Liu's and Sala da Pranzo.

"Projects from the Tap Project are designed to be long-term solutions for access to clean water. They include installing pipelines to bring water to communities and building wells to access local groundwater.  By increasing access to clean drinking water, the Tap Project has improved the safety and quality of life for millions of people," Ringsred said.