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Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014

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Zachary Klingenberg in Lord of the Dance.
Zachary Klingenberg in Lord of the Dance.

Lord of the Dance offers fancy footwork this Friday

More than 60 million people from 68 countries have seen Lord of the Dance, the highest-grossing Irish dance show in the world created in 1996 by Michael Flatley.

The show is coming to the Milwaukee Theatre on Friday, March 1 at 7:30 p.m.

Lord of the Dance is a love story of good versus evil based on mythical Irish folklore with more than 40 dancers handpicked by Flatley.

Twenty-year-old Zachary Klingenberg is the lead dancer with the challenging task of filling Flatley's shows. Originally from Columbus, Ohio, Klingenberg spent 15 years training and has won the Midwest Regional Championship, placed second in the North American Championship and placed eighth at the World Championship.

He graduated from Bexley High School in Columbus in 2010, and has been dancing with Lord of the Dance since.

OnMilwaukee.com recently chatted with Klingenberg over the phone about the challenges and joys of professional Irish dancing and life on the road.

OnMilwaukee.com: How long have you been Irish dancing?

Zachary Klingenberg: For 15 years. My family saw a production on St. Parick's Day (many years ago) and they enrolled my older brother in dance classes. Then my younger brother and I started taking classes, too. I was about 5 at the time. They both danced until they were freshman in high school, but I kept going.

OMC: How did you get the job with Lord of The Dance?

ZK: It was similar to applying to college. I mailed in a video and an application. Mr. Flatley reviews all of the applications and videos and a tour manager contacted me and asked me to join the show a week after I graduated from high school.

OMC: How long did it take you to learn the routine?

ZK: It took about a month of very rigorous training. Then, my first tour – which was three years ago – was in Taiwan.

OMC: Have you met Mr. Flatley?

ZK: Yes, I've met him in person. He did some of the training and he gives us a lot of advice. He really pushes you to be your absolute best.

OMC: What is your favorite …

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Mr. Webo's fish tacos are exceptional.
Mr. Webo's fish tacos are exceptional. (Photo: Royal Brevväxling)
The shrimp enchilado was good, too.
The shrimp enchilado was good, too. (Photo: Royal Brevväxling)
Owner Roman Torrez (left) and chef Jeremy Hoch take five.
Owner Roman Torrez (left) and chef Jeremy Hoch take five. (Photo: Royal Brevväxling)
Salsa times three.
Salsa times three. (Photo: Royal Brevväxling)
Order a margarita on the rocks and it's made from scratch.
Order a margarita on the rocks and it's made from scratch. (Photo: Royal Brevväxling)
Webo's opened last week and business was decent on a recent weeknight.
Webo's opened last week and business was decent on a recent weeknight. (Photo: Royal Brevväxling)
The decor is colorful and unique. It is unlike any other Mexican eatery in Milwaukee.
The decor is colorful and unique. It is unlike any other Mexican eatery in Milwaukee. (Photo: Royal Brevväxling)

First look: Mr. Webo's Mexican Food & Drink

The space on the southwest corner of Lincoln and Howell Avenues is destined to be a Mexican restaurant. Now that Guanajuato moved down the street to new digs, the latest Latin eatery to fill the space is Mr. Webo's, which opened last week.

Mr. Webo's – a play on the word "huevos" which means eggs in Spanish – is owner Roman Torrez's first venture and he wanted it to be different from other Mexican eateries in the city.

"This is a modern Mexican restaurant. Not the traditional Mexican decor or the usual Mexican music," says Torrez.

The menu features a range of offerings from classics like burritos and enchiladas to more unique items such as sopes and a Yucatan-style pork plate. Chef Jeremy Hoch commends his fish tacos and fajitas.

There is a nice balance between meat, seafood and veggie items and all of the vegetarian items are clearly identified.

The prices are higher than what you'd pay at other neighborhood and near-to-the-neighborhood Mexican restaurants. The fish tacos are $12.95, the veggie burritos are $10.95-$11.95. Entrees range from $8.95 to $12.95 and specialty plates from $12.95 to $15.95. Fajitas are $15.95 to $18.95.

All of the food is made to order so it takes a little bit longer to receive at the table. We appreciated this because it gave us time to enjoy the delicious homemade tortilla chips – thin strips that arrived still warm – and three very different salsas.

We also enjoyed the handcrafted margaritas which, when ordered on the rocks, are made from scratch. Blended margaritas are made with a mix.

Our meals were worth the wait. The shrimp enchilado ($15.95) was really good and smothered in one of the tangiest, smokiest sauces I've experienced on similar dishes.

The fish tacos featured flavorful pieces of tilapia very lightly seasoned and crusted in white and blue cornmeal and topped with avocado crema, chipotle aoli and amazing glazed shredded cabbage.

Both meals came with un-lardy beans and the perfectly steamed white rice with …

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Mmmmmmmargaritas.
Mmmmmmmargaritas. (Photo: shutterstock.com)

Margaritas get a holiday

"Bar Month" at OnMilwaukee.com is back for another round – brought to you by Aperol, Pinnacle, Jameson, Fireball, Red Stag and Avion. The whole month of February, we're serving up intoxicatingly fun articles on bars and clubs – including guides, the latest trends, bar reviews and more. Grab a designated driver and dive in!

Apparently, Friday, Feb. 22 is National Margarita Day which is enough of a reason for me to treat myself to a salty-rimmed libation after what will be, most likely, a long week.

So the only question left is where to celebrate this thirst quenching, potentially dangerous non-holiday. In this year's Best Of contest, readers picked La Fuente, and although I enjoy dining there occasionally, it would not be my personal choice as a go-to spot simply for margaritas.

Here are a few places that I think mix a mean margarita and, as always, feel free to add your favorite via the Talkback feature.

COA. These made-from-scratch margaritas are absolutely delicious and not too sweet which is key for me. I am not a mall person, but I will make a stop at Bayshore just to have one. (And to buy a few things at Trader Joe's, like edamame and cheap wine, for example.)

Conejito's. Perhaps the most controversial margarita in the city. People seem to love 'em or hate 'em. I usually get extra salt on the rim to combat the lemonadey flavor, but I really like the taste, the size (small-ish) and the cost. (Cheapest in town.) I've had so many of these over the years they are now one of my comfort drinks. Wait, do I really have comfort drinks? Uh-oh.

Riviera Maya. Although I prefer the classic lime margarita the most, Riviera Maya has a great selection of handcrafted margaritas. Especially if you plan to drink only one, as I usually do (tequila makes me bossy and mean), this is a great place to really feel like you're treating yourself with a tamarindo – made with tamarind, tequila, triple sec, lemonade and a chili-salted rim – or an X-rated, featuring tequila, grape…

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A tiki drink is not a tiki drink unless it's served in a tiki glass.
A tiki drink is not a tiki drink unless it's served in a tiki glass. (Photo: shutterstock.com)

Alternative drinking vessels spike the fun factor

"Bar Month" at OnMilwaukee.com is back for another round – brought to you by Aperol, Pinnacle, Jameson, Fireball, Red Stag and Avion. The whole month of February, we're serving up intoxicatingly fun articles on bars and clubs – including guides, the latest trends, bar reviews and more. Grab a designated driver and dive in!

What we consume our beverages from can be as interesting as the beverage itself. The pina colada served in the real coconut comes to mind immediately, although never having gone on a tropical vacation before, I can't say I've tried one.

I have, however, enjoyed adult beverages from a few memorable containers. Here are a few I remember anyway.

Boots: Years ago, there was a bar called Zur Krone in the current Crazy Water space in Walker's Point that served beer in a glass boot. This was the first time I experienced this German drinking tradition, which requires a certain way of holding the boot or else you'll get a splash of beer to the face.

I later had one at the Mader's bar, called the Knights Bar, where they are sold in one- or two-liter sizes.

The Wicked Hop also features two drinks served in a boot. The Glass Slipper is a Bloody Mary served in a 97-ounce boot and The Heifer is a two-liter mix of Spotted Cow and orange juice. If you finish either of these drinks, the boot is yours to keep as a souvenir of your over-indulgence.

Tiki glasses: Foundation and Lucky Joe's Tiki Lounge both have a great selection of ceramic mugs themed around pirates, skulls, cats, hula girls and of the course the classic long-faced Easter Island masks. Best of all, you can pay a little more and take the glass with you.

At Random also serves the famous Tiki Love Bowl which is served in a massive goblet, complete with a piece of flaming fruit.

Horns:  You can party like it's 1599 at the Bristol Renaissance Faire where the beer and mead are often consumed via drinking horns, usually worn around the neck. I do not own such a vessel myself, but I dran…

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