Sign in | Register now | Like us on FacebookLike Us | Follow us on TwitterFollow Us

Milwaukee's Daily Magazine for Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014

Mon
Hi: 56
Lo: 46
Tue
Hi: 64
Lo: 46
Wed

Lo: 56
Advertise on OnMilwaukee.com
Is this sub shop closed for good?
Is this sub shop closed for good?

East Side Suburpia temporarily closed

After months of keeping irregular hours, the East Side Suburpia, 2264 N. Prospect Ave., is temporarily closed, according to an employee at the Original Suburpia, 10853 W. Bluemound Rd.

The employee says the East Side sub shop, which opened in 2007, will reopen "soon."

Hmm. Stay tuned to OnMilwaukee.com for more information about this. Read more about the company's ongoing legal issues here.

Adios, Cafe La Paloma.
Adios, Cafe La Paloma.

Cafe La Paloma is closed

Walker's Point Mexican eatery Cafe Paloma, 606 S. 5th St., has closed. Owner Jose Chavez is still hoping to sell the business, but regardless, he is no longer going to operate the restaurant that opened last summer.

"I’m so full of gratitude toward my customers; however, the winter has been too long, people are very sensitive to weather patterns and I was running out of money," says Chavez.

Chavez, who is an artist and holds a business degree, plans to return to making art full time.

Cafe La Paloma offered a unique Mexican menu and artistic decor. It will be missed.

Owner Susan Nolan has lived in Bay View for 28 years.
Owner Susan Nolan has lived in Bay View for 28 years.
The space is contemporary, creative and cozy.
The space is contemporary, creative and cozy.
Splashes of color add a lot of cheer.
Splashes of color add a lot of cheer.
Cream City Swirl is inside a former salon.
Cream City Swirl is inside a former salon.

First look: Cream City Swirl

Cream City Swirl, 2663 S. Kinnickinnic Ave., opened on Sunday, April 20 – which was Easter – and owner Susan Nolan says it has been a whirlwind of excitement ever since.

Last summer, Nolan took over the space, which was formerly a salon called Hair Arkitekts, after a couple of years of researching the concept.

Cream City Swirl offers weigh-and-pay yogurt, gelato, made-to-order crepes and Stone Creek Coffee.

Nolan, with the help of other professionals, completely remodeled the space which feels modern and spacious yet cozy. 

One wall features custom-designed wallpaper with words such as "swirl," "Bay View," "muy bueno" and "indulge" and the ceiling is adorned with 16 vintage-looking mirrors. The pleasing periwinkle-painted chairs actually made me crave sweets. (Good job, Susan.)

There’s also a fireplace and, later this spring, there will be a patio.

Cream City features four frozen yogurt machines with three flavors each – the middle machine offers a swirl of flavors. Nolan uses a different yogurt company than most of the yogurt spots in Milwaukee: Honey Hill Farms based in Arkansas.

"I was looking for very high end ingredients," she says.

There are 18 cold toppings and 10 dry toppings to choose from, including fruit, nuts and candy. The yogurt is sold by weight and costs 47 cents per ounce.

Nolan says she enjoys seeing the different combinations people choose for their yogurt toppings – particularly kids.

"Sometimes, with kids you want to ask, 'Where's the yogurt?’" she says.

Cream City Swirl offers the locally-made La Coppa gelato in five different flavors. "The raspberry flavor is over half raspberries," says Nolan. "It’s all very natural."

The made-to-order crepes are available with golden, chocolate or gluten-free batter. Customers can build their own or pick one from the menu such as the KK Classic that’s topped with lemon, butter and sugar and costs $4.50.

The Vanguard will soon open next door and Nolan says the beer-cocktail-sa…

Read more...
Construction will end this summer and the hotel is projected to open in the fall.
Construction will end this summer and the hotel is projected to open in the fall.
In-progress ceiling decor on the hotel's third floor.
In-progress ceiling decor on the hotel's third floor.
Here comes the carpeting!
Here comes the carpeting!
Guest room, almost completed.
Guest room, almost completed.
The flame will remain!
The flame will remain!
Internal communications specialist Chantel Kuczmarski  (on left) and Kaelyn Cervero on the hotel patio.
Internal communications specialist Chantel Kuczmarski (on left) and Kaelyn Cervero on the hotel patio.
Exterior shot from patio.
Exterior shot from patio.
The future hotel lobby will feature a "tree canopy."
The future hotel lobby will feature a "tree canopy."
New terrazzo floor.
New terrazzo floor.
Under-construction Tribal Room.
Under-construction Tribal Room.
A rendering of the hotel's banquet room.
A rendering of the hotel's banquet room.
Rendering of a queen suite.
Rendering of a queen suite.
Rendering of the finished project.
Rendering of the finished project.

First look: Potawatomi's new (and still under-construction) hotel

Earlier today, I added a hard hat and safety goggles to my average Monday attire and toured the still-under-construction Potawatomi Bingo Casino Hotel. (The hotel will change its name this summer to Potawatomi Hotel & Casino.)

Construction started in the summer of 2012 and is expected to be completed by mid-summer 2014. The hotel will, most likely, open to the public this fall.

Despite the tarps and dust and unpainted walls and exposed plumbing, the hotel is already impressive due to the incredible amount of natural light and the views, which will undeniably rival as some of the city’s best. 

When complete, the hotel will be 18 stories high  – the superstitious will be happy to know there won’t be a floor 13 – with 341 rooms ranging in size and amenities. (Fun factoid: 415 soap dishes and 381 ice buckets are already on order.)

The hotel will also include seven meeting / party rooms, in-house dining, full bar, coffee shop and exercise area. An additional parking garage featuring 1,400 more stalls is also in the works.

"All of this will allow us to bring people to Milwaukee who have never been here, as well as national conventions," says Kaelyn Cervero, Potawatomi's sales and catering operations manager.

The restaurant concept and coffee vendor is still in the works, but Hassan Abdel-Moneim, Potawatomi’s hotel director, says they are shooting for local.

"We are going with local companies whenever we can," says Abdel-Moneim. "Including local construction companies and Kohler fixtures."

The hotel will cost about $150 million with $97.5 million in construction costs and $47 million in construction payroll. Once in operation, the project is estimated to generate $10 million a year in additional revenue for the city of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, VISIT Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin.

The hotel will add approximately 230 permanent jobs to the 2,600 already existing jobs at the casino.

The project has been in progress for 514 days without a singl…

Read more...