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"Ovarian Psycos" screens tonight at The Times as part of the Milwaukee Film Festival.
"Ovarian Psycos" screens tonight at The Times as part of the Milwaukee Film Festival.

Inspiring "Ovarian Psycos" sideswipes intimacy

Xela de la X founded Ovarian Psycos – a bicycle collective of Los Angeles Latinas who ride together in solidarity and to send a feminist message from the streets to high-crime neighborhoods afflicted with domestic violence – as "a refuge for the runaway, the throwaway."

The bandana-wearing "bicycling brigade" provides a sense of empowerment for the members, many of whom have experienced a trauma, long term abuse and/or feel marginalized as women in male-dominated communities.

The group has closed, monthly "Luna rides" during the full moon and hosts larger rides to which they invite more of the surrounding community. Male riders are not allowed on the rides which creates some flack from the community both in real life and on social media. However, it’s made clear that most of the cycling world is already male dominated, and the Psycos are very open to including people who may look like men and/or are biologically male, but identify as women.

During the 60-minute documentary of the same name by Joanna Sokolowski and Kate Trumbull-LaValle, we meet numerous members of the group, including Xela, a hip-hop spoken word artist and a single mother, who was sexually abused by her father, but her religious mother refused to believe her. We also delve inside the world of Evie, a student who rides with the Psycos despite her mother’s disapproval and internally struggles with her choice to put her time and energy into the collective rather than a job.

All of the documented women are extremely articulate and natural on camera. They offer insight into both women’s and Latinx issues. But unfortunately, the documentary doesn’t dig deep enough into more of the women's lives for us to feel a strong emotional impact.

It is, however, inspirational because it reveals how determination and desire can build community from the disparate and often fractured lives of women living in East L.A.

The film needed grittier footage of the rides and commentary from the members to bet…

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Deb is rad.
Deb is rad.

Rad Milwaukee Woman: Deborah Telman of Johnson Controls

Welcome to a series introducing the women who were nominated by professionals and will be honored at "The Rad Women Celebration: Being Rad for Social Change." The event is hosted by the Women’s Fund of Greater Milwaukee and will take place on Thursday, Oct. 20 at the Italian Conference Center. The idea was inspired by the bestselling book "Rad American Women A to Z," by Kate Schatz, who is the keynote speaker at the event. For more information, go here

Deborah Telman serves as the vice president and general counsel and COE leader – Litigation, Labor & Employment and Legal Operations – for Johnson Controls.

She is also a board member for Harriett’s Daughters, a group of professional women working collectively with peer organizations to advocate for African-American communities.

In 2016, Telman received the Transformative Leadership Award by Inside Counsel and was recognized in 2015 as Most Influential Black Lawyers by Savoy Magazine.

She is also a former Board Member of the Illinois Housing Development Authority, the recipient of the Alta May Hulett Award by the Chicago Bar Association and the former director of the Chicago Bar Association Foundation.

But Telman’s "radness" runs deeper. Keep reading.

OnMilwaukee: What is your "mission" with the work that you do?

Deborah Telman: My mission is to be an active leader in Corporate America and to be a leader for change for more diversity and inclusion.

What does success mean to you?

Proudly and unapologetically using my time so that when I look back at the arc of my life I am proud of my accomplishments and made meaningful contributions to support my community and the next generation. I stand on the shoulders of so many others that we must give back and make an impact.

Who or what have you learned from the most?

My husband Nigel is my most trusted advisor. He is strategic and calm whenever there is uncertainty and chaos.

What would you like to see change for women in the workforce?

I would lik…

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Pokémon! Go!
Pokémon! Go!

Calling all Pokémon fans!

Pokémon enthusiasts of all ages will flock to the Riverside on Friday night to check out "Pokémon: Symphonic Evolutions," a video game concert featuring the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra.

The concert takes place on Friday, Sept. 30 at the Riverside Theater at 8 p.m. and features new orchestral arrangements and visuals drawn from recent and classic Pokémon video games.

"We perform an all new version of the famous Pokémon theme, ‘Gotta Catch 'Em All,’ as well as the greatest hits from each generation of Pokémon games," says Chad Seiter, the show’s producer, music director and arranger.

"Pokémon: Symphonic Evolutions" also showcases the entire game chronology, beginning with Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue, all the way through Pokémon X and Pokémon Y.

Fans are encouraged to arrive early to play a "Who's That Pokémon?" pre show. They are also welcome and encouraged to bring their 3DS systems or phones so that they can "catch" Pokémon throughout the show.

The show has been touring since 2014, prior to the recent Pokémon Go craze. 

"That said, Pokémon Go has been super exciting, and we love how it's introducing this wonderful world to so many new people, and in many cases reigniting a passion for it in others," says Jeron Moore, producer and creative director of the show.

So how does a symphony adapt to what is usually electronic music? According to Seiter, better than one might expect.

"It's a fun, creative art to take classic 8-bit music and convert it to the orchestra. The results are epic," says Seiter.

The show was been designed for people of all ages and interests. "Whether you're there for the games or there for the orchestra, you'll find something to enjoy," says Moore.

Go here for tickets.

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"Success means embracing and enjoying the challenge to learn so I can contribute to the world around me, each day," says Katherine Charlton.
"Success means embracing and enjoying the challenge to learn so I can contribute to the world around me, each day," says Katherine Charlton.

Rad Milwaukee Woman: Attorney Katherine Charlton

Welcome to a series introducing the women who were nominated by professionals and will be honored at "The Rad Women Celebration: Being Rad for Social Change." The event is hosted by the Women’s Fund of Greater Milwaukee and will take place on Thursday, Oct. 20 at the Italian Conference Center. The idea was inspired by the bestselling book "Rad American Women A to Z," by Kate Schatz, who is the keynote speaker at the event. For more information, go here

Katherine Charlton has worked as an attorney at Hawks Quindel since 2005. Her practice areas include employment law representing employees, family law and fair housing law.

Charlton is the current program co-chair of the State Bar of Wisconsin "Annual Employment Law Update" and has served as the chair of the Legal Assistant Committee of the State Bar of Wisconsin, as a board member for the ACLU, Collaborative Family Law Council of Wisconsin, Association for Women Lawyers and more.

Charlton's level of fairness and compassion make her an integral part of the justice system and she has deeply affected many individual's and families' lives for the better. In short, she is one rad Milwaukee woman. 

OnMilwaukee: What is your personal "mission" with the work that you do?

Katherine Charlton: My professional "mission" broadly is to use the skills and training I have as a lawyer to improve access to justice. I use empathy and problems solving skills with my clients who are often facing significant life challenges like losing their jobs, facing a divorce or other painful family crisis or experiencing discrimination at work or in their living situation.

I use those same skills in the broader community to provide pro bono legal services to those who cannot otherwise afford them, by representing individuals in family law matters and staffing a pro se family law clinics and participating in a State Bar online legal advice service, all in an attempt to improve the access to justice of people of more limited means.

Wh…

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