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Moments after Day's tee shot plunked Pawlinski in the back.
Moments after Day's tee shot plunked Pawlinski in the back.
The bruises as of Monday, Aug. 17.
The bruises as of Monday, Aug. 17.

The painful way a Milwaukee guy helped Jason Day win the PGA Championship

WHAP! "What the heck was that? Did I just get stung by a bee?

We are golf nuts in my family. I've played some and I've witnessed my share of professional tournaments. Among my highlights; I've attended the Women's U.S. Open at Blackwolf Run in both 1998 and 2012 and the Men's PGA Championship at Whistling Straights in 2010 and again this past weekend.  

I also have a knack for picking the winner of the championships I attend. In 1998 I told everyone within earshot that LPGA rookie Se Ri Pak would win the U.S. Open. She did and then went onto a Hall of Fame career. Last week, two days before the PGA Championship began, posted on Facebook that Jason Day, my favorite golfer, would win and I submitted my reasons why. He was a 12-1 shot by the way.  



As a father-son bonding experience I treated my son Aaron to the Thursday and Sunday rounds of the PGA.  Aaron is a 17 year old senior-to-be and a solid varsity golfer at Greendale High School. On Thursday morning we arrived at Whistling Straights early to watch our dream threesome of Dustin Johnson, Rickie Fowler and Jason Day begin their first round at 8:05 a.m. on the 10th hole.

Jason Day was playing well at -1 par after five holes.  A plethora of spectators flooded the the 15th tee box so Aaron suggested we hustle down the left fairway of #15, known as "Grand Strand" to see the group's tee shots land on the 518 yard par 4 hole.

Then it happened.

WHAP! While walking near the 310-yard mark, with my back to the golfers, I felt a sudden and sharp sting in the area of my right kidney. Immediately, I saw a golf ball drop between my feet and roll to my left down a slight embankment. "Oh My Gosh! Dad that ball has a kangaroo logo on it," said Aaron. I was stunned, but we quickly and logically assumed it was the Aussie, Jason Day's ball. We high-fived, and guarded that ball like a mother goose protecting her egg.

The Marshall arrived, I told him what happened and he asked if I was okay which I was. Several fans sugges…

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Tame Impala's new record "Currents" currently stands as one of the year's best albums.
Tame Impala's new record "Currents" currently stands as one of the year's best albums.

The touching confusion of Tame Impala's "Currents"

Tame Impala’s newest album "Currents" drops today. A leaked version of the Australian band's third studio album was featured on NPR’s "First Listen," and it has been circulating the internet for a week now generating buzz. Pitchfork compared it to My Bloody Valentine's "Loveless," Radiohead's "Kid A" and Wilco's "Yankee Foxtrot Hotel," while The Guardian called it a "luscious new album."

But even without the hype, it is likely one of the best albums of the year.

"Currents" delves deeply into the inner turmoil of frontman Kevin Parker as he tries to draw connections between a dying romance, his musical career and his persona. Everything seems to be moving too fast for him to process, and he acknowledges the changes without ever being fully convinced of them.

The album starts with "Let it Happen" a tense introduction to the new music and mindset of "Currents." Parker, seemingly talking to himself, asks for the grace to accept life and just "Let it Happen." It starts out seemingly upbeat, but through careful use of repetition and dub, he creates dark, soulful bridge distinctly noted by the orchestral strings that cast a somber light to the psych-disco sound. The slow methodical repetition changing into a new unique sound that morphs and shifts back to a happier, upbeat sound. Parker is changing from "Lonerism" to "Currents." It’s a new direction, yet there is a hint of mourning.

Some of the songs like "Yes, I’m Changing," "Past Life" and the emotional core of the album, "Eventually," center on the last flames of a fading romance, but it’s often unclear whether these songs are addressing: Is it an ex-love, Parker’s fans or an older version of Parker himself? Is it even Parker doing the breaking-up in "Eventually"? Of course, that is not a technique new to any art form, but it adds to the general confusion which doubles as the soul-searching heart of the album.

Perhaps the most notable shift of the album is the transition away from the psychedelic landsc…

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Kulfi ice cream imported from "House of Spices" in New York.
Kulfi ice cream imported from "House of Spices" in New York.
Goat biryani from "Vanis Kitchen."
Goat biryani from "Vanis Kitchen."
"CocoMoon" Boba Tea and Vietnamese iced coffee from "Pho King."
"CocoMoon" Boba Tea and Vietnamese iced coffee from "Pho King."
Grilled pork banh mi from "Vanis Kitchen."
Grilled pork banh mi from "Vanis Kitchen."
An "Ang Moh" food vendor.
An "Ang Moh" food vendor.
People crowd the food vendors at Asia Fest.
People crowd the food vendors at Asia Fest.

Asia Fest serves up diversity

The OnMilwaukee.com Summer Festivals Guide is presented by Pick 'n Save, Where Wisconsin Saves on Groceries. Pick 'n Save is Wisconsin proud, and excited to help promote and feed the great Milwaukee summer that includes festivals and fun nearly every day. Click to save here!

Growing up, I never really thought much of the Asian community of Milwaukee; though, I thought often about the experience of Asian-Americans in the U.S. as compared to other ethnic groups. I certainly believe it to be somewhat different than that of other groups in America.

But I can only claim to be half-Asian. My father is a Texan, born and raised. He too felt the urge to migrate to greener pastures. He left his home state and eventually settled in Wisconsin.

But it’s funny to imagine any immigrant in Asia picking, of all the places in the U.S., Milwaukee as their next home city. I recognize it isn’t always by choice – and I certainly don’t mean any offense to Milwaukee – but with an Asian population of only 4.4% as of the 2008 census, Wisconsin has never struck me as a hub for incoming Asian immigrants. And yet, waves of incoming Bangladeshi, Hmong, Laotian, Asian Indian, and Chinese immigrants continue to arrive and make the Brew City their home.

So I decided to check out Milwaukee’s Asian community this weekend. I went with my mother to the first annual "Asia Fest" this weekend. She immigrated from Singapore to America in 1978. She met my father, bore two slightly ugly and very neurotic kids, and eventually settled in Wisconsin. I figured that there was no better place to bond and chat about our Asian heritage than at a Milwaukee Asian cultural festival.

In the past, Asian Moon festival, which was annually held at the Henry Maier Festival Park, was Milwaukee’s de facto Asian festival. It was often held early in the summer and seemed to be plagued by miserable luck. Whether it was bad weather or low attendance, the festival never seemed to gain much traction with the general…

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Talib takes over at Turner Hall.
Talib takes over at Turner Hall. (Photo: Benjamin Zick)

Turner Hall and turn tables: Kweli kicks crisp rhymes

As the medium of print seems to be slowly falling out favor in the 21st century, I have to admire hip-hop for what it is: sonic poetry. It is accessible, lyrical – by definition, I suppose – and it makes the beats and rhythms of poetry more vivid.

Even in the internet age of popular musical amateurism – in which college students in basements can churn out static-laden vocals over stale beats – there are still dedicated artists and true poets who dedicate themselves to the craft of hip-hop.

And, of course, Talib Kweli is one of the true hip-hop legends.

That is why I was so excited to see him perform live. Kweli’s main strength lies in the soundscape portraits he paints. It’s hard to believe that he can string together the dense lines of lyrics the way he does. Listening to his rhymes is the audial equivalent of a watching a Rube Goldberg contraption: words and phrases blend in unexpected and seemingly inconceivable ways that lead to a beautiful ending that leaves you stunned about the entire process. His songs are heady, cerebral and deeply personal.

The first opening act were the homegrown Milwaukee DJs from "True Skool." It is hard not to admire their dedication to hip-hop as they still spin vinyl records on old-school turn tables. The second act was "Space Invadas." They weren’t bad, but, to be honest, they weren’t terribly memorable. But the final opening act, "K’Valentine," nearly stole the show.

She has a voice similar to that of Nicky Minaj, but her lyrics were deadly serious, fiercely feminist and presented with stunning flow. Announcing herself as a Chicago native who was "anti-Chiraq" (a nickname combining "Chicago" and "Iraq" to suggest similar levels of gun violence in both), she launched into a lyrical tirade against the city’s violence that literally made me shiver.

After that power performance, I stood waiting for Kweli near the front of the stage. The ballroom was buzzing with excitement and the DJ was hyping up the crowd. I…

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