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In Travel & Visitors Guide

The Primanti Bros. sandwich is a Pittsburgh staple.

In Travel & Visitors Guide

The restaurant has more than a dozen locations in Pittsburgh and a couple in Florida.

Is this really the best sandwich in America?


PITTSBURGH -- There is no shortage of pride in the "Steel City."

Walk around Downtown Pittsburgh for any length of time and you are virtually certain to encounter a steady stream of friendly, easy-going folks with distinct accents and dresser drawers stuffed with T-shirts honoring their favorite sports teams. There is a thriving art scene, cool museums, a smattering of trendy shops and restaurants and some historic neighborhoods with unique drinking and dining options.

In some ways, it's like Milwaukee -- with three rivers instead of a lake.

Pittsburghers are laid-back and approachable. They are funny and a bit self-deprecating.

And, they are crazy about a sandwich.

If you ask any cab driver, hotel employee, store clerk or random person on the street for advice on what to do, the question is almost inevitable:

"Have you had a Primanti Brothers sandwich yet?"

Sure, the locals love their Super Bowl and Stanley Cup titles. The real source of civic pride, though, comes from a signature sandwiched serves by Primanti Brothers, a chain of casual eateries with more than 18 locations.

What makes a Primanti Brothers sandwich special, you ask?

It's unique. The sandwich consists of grilled meat, a vinegar-based cole slaw (no mayo), tomato slices and hand-cut, skin-on French fries stacked high (nearly six inches) between two soft pieces of fresh, soft Italian bread.

It's been called "heavenly." It's been called "the best bar-time food in the world." It's been called a "gut bomb." Some simply call it "the best sandwich in America."

According to local legend, the original Primanti Brothers location is in Pittsburgh's Strip District, which once housed warehouses and produce yards and is now home to many retail shops, restaurants and condos.

In the 1930s, Joe Primanti designed a sandwich for truckers, who would pick one up and drive with one hand and eat with the other. He began selling it from a cart, but moved to a permanent location and sold sandwiches between 3 a.m. and 3 p.m. -- prime time for truckers and dock workers in the area.

Today, Primanti's is popular for lunch and late at night, when crowds line up to order varieties that include simple selections like corned beef and cheese ($6.29), Turkey or chicken ($6.29), hot sausage and cheese ($5.99) and the classic "Pitts-burgher" cheese steak ($5.99), which is more like a burger than a Philly cheesesteak and is described as the "No. 2 seller," but actually dominates the sales charts.

Over the years, I've sampled pastrami, cheese steaks and the sweet sausage varieties and all were exceptional. This sandwiches, served wrapped in waxed paper, are warm, delicious and exceptionally messy. The slaw doesn't have mayo, but it drips onto the fries, which help hold things together. The bread has a doughy consistency reminiscent of Wonder bread, but it stands up to the other ingredients so perfectly that it's hard to imagine any other end pieces.

Now for the key question: Is it the best sandwich in the world?

I think the folks at the Carnegie Deli in New York City and a few other places may have something to say about that. For people in Pittsburgh, though, there is no substitute.

Mix in a little ketchup (Heinz 57 is the local favorite), some Red Devil hot sauce and a cold beer (Iron City?), and you have a meal that will fuel hours of activities like Pirates/Steelers/Penguins games, trips to the Warhol Museum or pounding Iron City beers until it's time to have another sandwich.


Talkbacks

BarSmartDotCom | April 23, 2010 at 3:23 p.m. (report)

Gargamel - I would say you are right. The sandwich I had at PNC park wasn't quite the same as what you get in a restaurant. It shouldn't be dry, and you should taste everything in it no matter what meat you get. If you ever make it back, ask someone to get you to Primanti's in The Strip. The original store.

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High_Life_Man | April 23, 2010 at 3:10 p.m. (report)

Iron City? Make mine a Yuengling please.

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muellertime09 | April 23, 2010 at 1:55 p.m. (report)

These sandwiches are FANtastic. I wasn't told by a friend they had fries in them, so I also ordered fries for the late night eats...just terrific all around.

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Gargamel | April 23, 2010 at 1:51 p.m. (report)

I went to a Brewers/Pirates game a few years ago and had one at the stadium and thought it was just okay. It was really dry and mostly fries. Maybe they're different at the actual restaurants, but I wasn't impressed with the stadium version, especially considering all the hype.

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Paddler | April 23, 2010 at 10:24 a.m. (report)

My best memories of growing up in Pittsburgh include, Grandpa taking me to the Strip District for a sandwich at Primanti Bros. Turns out 25 years before, he took my mom, aunts and uncles, also. Imagine my surprise 10 years ago upon walking out of a beach front hotel in Ft. Lauderdale, turning the corner and there sits Primanti Bros. Took my wife and daughter in for a sandwich and now a third generation has been exposed to greasy, slimy food which also is the best sandwich bite one can enjoy - but not daily or weekly - maybe annually.

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