Kip Moore rocked the Briggs & Stratton stage.
Kip Moore rocked the Briggs & Stratton stage.

Kip Moore brings good ol' boy fun to Big Gig

Kip Moore strutted onstage wearing denim jeans with an American flag bandanna hanging from the back pocket, a Rolling Stones tank top, a backwards trucker hat, work boots and a decent amount of stubble.
I’ve heard it said that Moore is the kind of artist who can successfully bridge the gap between "trucker rock" (the country music so many folks love to hate) and "real country" (in the vein of Mr. Cash himself).

That may be true, but it wasn’t evident from his show tonight. And I don’t mean that as an insult – because a 10 p.m. Summerfest crowd at the Briggs & Stratton stage didn’t come for dulcet tones. They came for a dude who sings with a plastic Solo cup in one hand and a flash in the other and catches girls’ bras as they toss them onstage. And for Milwaukee, tonight, Kip Moore was that dude.

In other words, truck yeah.

"Sh*t, this is gonna be fun!" he cried. "Y’all have to work in the morning?" He proceeded to tell a story about a boss of his who became frustrated with him always bringing his guitar to work. "He said, ‘Music will never pay you a dime." The boss said he could choose between working for him and playing his guitar.

Moore chose the guitar. "I guess I got the last laugh now," he told the crowd, before dedicating the last verse of "Reckless (Still Growin’ Up)" to "your boss man and my boss man."

Moore gave the crowd plenty of love, telling them that the last time he played Summerfest (at the same stage) the crowd consisted of 75 disinterested people, two of whom played c ards in the front row the entire time. "The whole f*ckin set!"

He was charming, too, with his Georgia colloquialisms ("right quick" was used more than once) and his kind attention to some fans he spotted in the front whom he identified to everyone as having been attending his shows for years – "Even when there were only five other people in the bar!"

He started the show on a rowdy note with "Crazy One More Time" and played one of his biggest hits, "Beer Money…

Read more...
A graphic released by Common Ground takes a stand to demand equal treatment of public school athletic facilities.
A graphic released by Common Ground takes a stand to demand equal treatment of public school athletic facilities.
Common Ground compares a "poor" rating with an "excellent" one. Only 33 sites were deemed "excellent."
Common Ground compares a "poor" rating with an "excellent" one. Only 33 sites were deemed "excellent."

Common Ground releases "Fair Play Report"

Earlier this week, Common Ground, a non-profit focusing on social issues in Southeastern Wisconsin, released the "Fair Play Report," detailing the need of Milwaukee county public school and athletic facilities to receive the same public funding as a potential new Bradley Center.

The report is the result of the inspection completed by over 100 Common Ground volunteers of all school outdoor athletic/recreational facilities in Milwaukee County.

"There are 290 public schools in 38 separate school districts in Milwaukee County. Common Ground volunteers inspected and evaluated the athletic/recreational spaces at each of the 268 sites that serve these schools," reads the executive summary.

"Of the 268 sites, 175 or 65 percent of them, were rated overall as Terrible, Poor or Fair by Common Ground leaders. The 65 percent does not take into account the 16 sites that do not have any outdoor athletic facilities at all."

Only 33 school sites were listed as "excellent."

"If public funds are used to build a new Bradley Center arena, then at least $150 million and perhaps as much as $250 million of these funds must be used to improve Milwaukee County public school athletic facilities and recreational spaces," states the group’s executive summary of a preliminary report on the condition of local school athletic facilities.

In a press release, Common Ground quoted MPS parent and CG member Jennifer O’Hear as saying that "if the Bucks get new, upgraded athletic facilities, then our children and county residents should get new, upgraded athletic facilities. It’s only FAIR!"

Common Ground’s Fair Play campaign was launched in April in response to the National Basketball Association’s saying that the Bradley Center requires upgrades to be on par with other arenas in the nation.

"Athletics provide kids with a sense of direction, discipline and self-confidence," said O’Hear. "Sadly, the reality is that 65 percent of our schools do not give our kids this opportunity."

T…

Read more...
fwqxafrbfqbfdebqrsycuruauxtru
Peregrine falcons have recovered as a species after being threatened by DDT in the '40s, '50s and '60s.
Peregrine falcons have recovered as a species after being threatened by DDT in the '40s, '50s and '60s. (Photo: shutterstock.com)

See live webcam of peregrine falcons nesting on Jones Island

Two peregrine falcons have made Jones Island their home after hatching this past spring.

Named Bit and Byte, the falcons have been banded by the Peregrine Falcon Society to ensure their safety. The Society is working with Veolia Water Milwaukee to host a live webcam streaming footage of Bit and Byte's nest. See the webcam here.

Peregrine falcons have increasingly used urban areas and man-made structures to nest. These birds of prey mate for life (aww!) and feed on smaller birds, reptiles and insects. They reach speeds of up to 200 mph in a "stoop" or dive towards their prey.

A major threat to this species came about with the widespread use of DDT and its breakdown product, DDE, but significant improvements were made with the ban of that substance and the species was removed from the Federal list of threatened and endangered species in 1999, although they continue to be monitored. There are only about 2,000 breeding pairs of peregrine falcons in North America today.

Cramer-Krasselt hosted their first-ever Bring Your Parents to Work Day on June 14.
Cramer-Krasselt hosted their first-ever Bring Your Parents to Work Day on June 14. (Photo: Stephen Seftar)
Parents got to see what a job is like at Wisconsin's largest ad agency.
Parents got to see what a job is like at Wisconsin's largest ad agency. (Photo: Stephen Seftar)
Parents and C-K employees participate in an overview of the agency's work.
Parents and C-K employees participate in an overview of the agency's work. (Photo: Stephen Seftar)
Breakout sessions followed, explaining things like digital media and social networking.
Breakout sessions followed, explaining things like digital media and social networking. (Photo: Stephen Seftar)

Cramer-Krasselt employees bring their parents to work

Will Smith said it best: parents just don’t understand.

Okay, maybe that’s not always true. But usually, when it comes to what you do every day at your job, there’s a bit of a generational gap.

The culture committee at advertising and PR agency Cramer-Krasselt is responsible for organizing enrichment events for employees throughout the year – like Take Your Child to Work Day. This year, they had a fun new idea.

"We work in an industry that’s had a lot of change – technology, digital. Many of the parents of the employees, they think they understand what their kids do, but they don’t fully understand," said Betsy Brown, executive vice president at C-K.

Enter C-K’s first-ever Bring Your Parents to Work Day, held last Friday afternoon.

"We wanted to have parents get a better understanding what their kids do in an advertising agency ad give them an opportunity to learn more about what CK does on a daily basis and how their child might be involved in the process," said Brown.

Around 40 parents visited the Cramer-Krasselt offices in the Third Ward on June 14 to learn more about what their sons and daughters do every day as an employee of Wisconsin’s largest ad agency.

Brown said that, for having around 160 employees, the turnout was impressive. Some parents traveled from out of state and even brought grandparents. There was a nice variety in age as well, she estimated, with the ‘rents falling anywhere from age 60 to 80. The group was treated to an introduction and overview of what the agency does, followed by breakout sessions that focused on topics ranging from digital and social media to strategic and creative development.

The parents got to shadow their kids as they went about the rest of their afternoon, wrapping things up with a cocktail hour in the cafe (something you probably don’t see at Take Your Child to Work Day).

"We also hosted Take Your Child to work day a couple months ago and I think we had an equal amount of kids turn out (as…

Read more...