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Madison's Jerry Kelly is the subject of an interesting story on the PGA Tour website.
Madison's Jerry Kelly is the subject of an interesting story on the PGA Tour website. (Photo: pgatour.com)

Great PGA Tour website story focuses on Madison golfer Jerry Kelly

Jerry Kelly, one of the most successful professional golfers ever to come out of Wisconsin, is the subject of a long, interesting story on the PGA Tour website.

The 50-year-old Kelly, who has spent 21 seasons on the Tour, was a winner three times but described himself as a "successful journeyman" during his career.

Born in Madison, Kelly played hockey at the University of Hartford before turning pro as a golfer in 1989, and he didn't make it onto the PGA Tour until 1996. Kelly and Madison's Steve Stricker have teamed to attract a Senior PGA Tour event, the American Family Insurance Open, to Madison.

You can read the whole story here.

The Milwaukee Ballet company watches anxiously as Michael Pink conducts the three-team draft.
The Milwaukee Ballet company watches anxiously as Michael Pink conducts the three-team draft. (Photo: Anne Metcalf)

Dancer draft first step in development of Genesis competition for MKE ballet

It didn’t rank up there with the National Football league draft, but the Genesis draft was just as exciting if you are a fan of ballet.

Genesis is the international choreography competition staged every two years by Michael Pink and his Milwaukee Ballet Company. This year Genesis will take place at the Pabst Theater Feb. 16-19.

The competition features three young guest choreographers who are selected from a big field of applicants. The chance to work on a daily basis with a professional company and with the full support of the entire organization is very attractive to choreographers the world over.

Each choreographer gets eight dancers to work with, and they chose them during a draft at the start of the week. Pink held two large flower pots, one with the male dancers and one with the female dancers. Each choreographer drew on an alternating basis until they each had a mini-company of eight dancers.

The actual choreography started the same day and all three are works in progress.

"These three choreographers all have a recognized body of work," Pink said. "They look young but they have a lot of great work behind them. This is going to be something very special for Milwaukee."

Here are the three contestants, their teams, and the music they will be using.

Enrico Morelli
Jonathan Batista, Marize Fumero, Davit Hovhannisyan, Erik Johnson, Alexander Negron, Luz San Miguel, Lizzie Tripp, Lahna Vanderbush.

Morelli  will be using a Piano Concerto by Chopin and a new composition by Adrien Casalis, a young French musician who composes electronic music.

Mariana Oliveira
Parker Brasser-Vos, Itzel Hernandez, Annia Hidalgo, Quinby Kasch – Milwaukee Ballet II, Rachel Malehorn, Timothy O’Donnell, Isaac Sharratt, Ariel Soto.

Oliveira will be using music from Charlie Chaplin’s "The Circus."

George Williamson
Marie Collins, Randy Crespo, Garrett Glassman, Alana Griffith, Patrick Howell, Janel Meindersee, Barry Molina, Nicole Teague-Howell.

Williamson  will be us…

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Parking on both sides of the street is finally legal, thanks to some city common sense.
Parking on both sides of the street is finally legal, thanks to some city common sense.

Our long municipal nightmare is over! Parking regulations that make sense

This story originally ran Feb 15, 2016. No changes have been made other than updating applicable links. 

Grab your flags, your noisemakers, your flashing lights and your ticker tape. Our long municipal nightmare is over.

As difficult as it may be to believe, the City of Milwaukee, under continued pressure from Ald. Nik Kovac, has actually done something that reeks of common sense. It’s so logical that it’s a miracle it hasn’t happened before.

The virtually constant mystery of where people are permitted to park their cars in Milwaukee at night has been solved, and most can sleep safely at night, not wondering whether the parking checker gnomes are slapping a ticket on their windshield.

Here’s the background, or at least some of the background because the whole city parking thing is only slightly less complicated than the formula for a nuclear bomb and about as friendly.

Milwaukee has something called alternate street parking meaning  you can only park on one side of the street. On even dates, like Feb. 12, you have to park on the even side of the street. On odd dates, like Feb. 13, it’s the odd side of the street.

The change means that if  you live in one of the exception areas (call your alderperson to find out if that's you) you can park on both sides of the street unless the Department of Public Works calls an operation, which normally means a snow storm where they have to plow.

As Kovac said, "There’s aren’t any signs for this. It’s just something you have to know." You can check if your street allows parking on both sides here

This whole thing never seemed to make much sense and Kovac – with co-sponsors, Milele Coggs, Robert Bauman, Jose Perez, Tony Zielinski and Bob Donovan – finally, after years of work, came up with a solution.

They got it past the rest of the Common Council, and now, with streets almost barren of snow, you can actually park on both sides of the street at night. Not the entire city, of course, but the e…

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Bronson Koenig (left) and Nigel Hayes are among college players not afraid to speak out about their beliefs.
Bronson Koenig (left) and Nigel Hayes are among college players not afraid to speak out about their beliefs. (Photo: Wisconsin Badgers Men's Basketball Facebook)

NY Times takes deep look at politics inside Badgers hoops locker room

The New York Times recently sent a reporter and photographer to Madison to talk with three members of Wisconsin's nationally ranked basketball team.

The three, Nigel Hayes, Jordan Hill and Bronson Koenig, all have crucial roles with the team and are also leading a fight for more athletes to get involved in social issues. Hayes was the preseason pick for Big Ten Player of the Year, Koenig is the playmaking guard and Hill is a redshirt-junior contributor off the bench.

All three are articulate and very frank in explaining what they do, how they feel, what they want and how it has an impact on others.

Hayes noted the fact that he was in Madison, a city known for its liberal attitudes, makes it easier for an athlete to take a stand and speak out. He's advocating for college players to be paid and, along with Hill, has taken public stances on racial issues and events. Koenig, who is Native American, recently traveled to support protesters of the Dakota Access pipeline. 

You can read the Times article here.