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Bobby Sherman and Roland Kirk on the same grounds. I can't help but imagine a potential meeting.
Bobby Sherman and Roland Kirk on the same grounds. I can't help but imagine a potential meeting.

Remembering Summerfest '70 ... and a Sly demand for weed

The OnMilwaukee.com Summer Festivals Guide is presented by Pick 'n Save, Where Wisconsin Saves on Groceries. Pick 'n Save is Wisconsin proud, and excited to help promote and feed the great Milwaukee summer that includes festivals and fun nearly every day. Click to save here!

Thanks to my co-worker Jill Jensen-Matelski, I saw this cool Summerfest 1970 poster that you can see above. She found it on the Facebook group "You know you are from Milwaukee WI if you remember..."

My eyes immediately went to "Roland Kirk" and I was blown away. Then I saw Sly and the Family Stone, James Brown, Sarah Vaughan and so many other amazing acts.

And teen idol Bobby Sherman. On the same grounds as Roland Kirk? I can only imagine how a meeting between the two of them would've gone.

I also noticed "Sidewalker Skippers," who I wrote about here.

But the real story comes from Gary Christensen, bassist and director of the All-Star Super Band, who, incidentally, celebrates his birthday today. Back then, Christensen was a member of Yesterday's Children.

"As the opening act for Sly Stone, Yesterday's Children began a tight, rehearsed 30-minute tribute to James Brown," Gary posted on Facebook. "Ninety minutes later we were still on stage covering for Sly, who refused to come out. The security fence was gone and the audience had their elbows on the stage. The band eventually stopped performing and ran into our bus parked next to the stage. At one point, Sly walked out on stage, promptly received a shock from the microphone – on the lips – exited and again refused to perform. The booker came on our band bus and begged for weed.

"He said Sly refused to perform unless more weed was provided. We all said we had none. Then one of our guys provided a couple of hand-rolled j's. I left when the beer tents were being invaded by the crowd. I thought it was 230,000 people, but the MPD estimated 190,000. Lots of angry people. Scary night. Summerfest does not talk about this night."

A few years la…

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The Flaming Lips brought the party outside at Summerfest on Saturday night.
The Flaming Lips brought the party outside at Summerfest on Saturday night. (Photo: David Bernacchi)

The Flaming Lips bring the party outside at Summerfest

The OnMilwaukee.com Summer Festivals Guide is presented by Pick 'n Save, Where Wisconsin Saves on Groceries. Pick 'n Save is Wisconsin proud, and excited to help promote and feed the great Milwaukee summer that includes festivals and fun nearly every day. Click to save here!

How on Earth does one explain the ongoing success of The Flaming Lips?

Don't get me wrong, frontman Wayne Coyne and company make interesting and engaging music and put on a hell of a show, but since when has that been enough?

Hailing from Oklahoma City, the band spent the '80s playing the indie club circuit, building a following devoted to the group's quirky music and theatrical (puppets!) performances, before striking gold with "She Don't Use Jelly," in the heart of the "alternative rock" explosion of the early 1990s.

But "Jelly" could have been a novelty, an exception, and it took six more years for The Flaming Lips to crack open the mainstream consciousness once again, this time with "The Soft Bulletin," an album full of irresistible pop songs rendered in lush strokes.

The single, "Waiting for Superman" caught on and the record was a hit, especially in Britain. It's follow-up, "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" dished up the title track and "Do You Realize??" in 2002 and cemented the band's success, as did "At War With the Mystics" four years later.

But in the decade since, the band has only issued two "traditional" (for lack of a better word) albums – 2009's "Embryonic" and 2013's "The Terror" – amid a flurry of engaging and interesting electronic music film scores, complete re-recordings of Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon" and The Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" and a pair of releases made with the band's "fwends."

A (seemingly unlikely) collaboration with Miley Cyrus is apparently in the works.

Challenging, groundbreaking, explorational, risk-taking ... yes, all of the above. But as a recipe for pop success, it seems like suicide.

And yet...

While the …

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Milwaukee's Maritime drew a great crowd to the KNE New Music Stage at Summerfest Saturday night.
Milwaukee's Maritime drew a great crowd to the KNE New Music Stage at Summerfest Saturday night. (Photo: Alize Chan)

Maritime: Milwaukee, Milwaukee, c'mon!

The OnMilwaukee.com Summer Festivals Guide is presented by Pick 'n Save, Where Wisconsin Saves on Groceries. Pick 'n Save is Wisconsin proud, and excited to help promote and feed the great Milwaukee summer that includes festivals and fun nearly every day. Click to save here!

Saturday night marked Maritime's first Big Milwaukee Gig since it released its paean to its hometown, "Milwaukee," in April:

Earlier this week, the band's label Dangerbird Records – founded by Milwaukee ex-pat Jeff Castelaz – announced that Maritime's fifth full-length record – "Magnetic Bodies/Maps of Bones" – will drop on Oct. 16 (eight years to the day after the release of the quartet's third disc, "Heresy and the Hotel Choir").

So, did Brew City turn out to return the love and hear the new material?

First a little background...

One of Milwaukee's most successful and respected bands, Maritime grew out of the ashes of The Promise Ring, half of which was Maritime frontman Davey von Bohlen and drummer Dan Didier.

When that band came apart just on the cusp of major success and right after the release of its most accomplished record, "Wood/Water" – produced by Stephen Street (who most famously worked with The Smiths) – von Bohlen and Didier teamed with Eric Axelson of D.C.'s The Dismemberment Plan to form Maritime, with guitarist Dan Hinz.

Justin Klug replaced Axelson in 2006.

Saturday night, with the sun in their eyes, Maritime played a solid hour-long set that ran through the band's back catalog and also previewed new material from the upcoming record.

Following a performance by ex-pat Milwaukee singer-songwriter Mark Mallman, von Bohlen and company got down to business quickly, opening with "Milwaukee." And, yes, Milwaukee turned out.

Cole Schulist, who runs front of house sound for the stage, said the crowd is among the biggest he's seen at the KNE.

"Absolutely one of the biggest," he said. "And they deserve it, too."

Schulist, a big fan, said he's been eager to mix…

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Bono, larger than life, and The Edge.
Bono, larger than life, and The Edge.

A more "innocent" approach boosts U2 experience

Has U2 gotten modest?

The Irish quartet has long been known for full-blown (critics might argue overblown) experiences, on the road – where one thinks back to the extravaganza that was the lengthy Zoo TV and Zooropa Tours – and also on record, where few would use that adjective to describe records like "Achtung Baby" or "The Unforgettable Fire."

Consider, too, the planned week-long Fallon show launch of "Songs of Innocence" last year – derailed by Bono’s bike accident – and the distribution of the record itself, unasked for, into everyone’s iTunes account ... for free.

If "modesty" – or "innocence" – is a word some might have applied to, say, 1981’s "October" LP, it’s rarely cropped up in descriptions of the band's career since.

But, fortunately, U2’s pomp and circumstance have long been tempered with philanthropy and, especially lately, a self-deprecating sense of humor.

Both that sense of humor and modesty were on view as the band played the second night of its eight-day, five-gig run at the United Center in Chicago on Thursday night.

As part of its iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE Tour – is that perceived modesty the "innocence" part? – U2 is pitching its tent for these lengthy residencies in a handful of North American cities. After a two-night break, there will be two more gigs on Sunday and Monday, before another pause and a final show on Thursday, July 2.

That's as close as they'll get to Milwaukee this time.

The house lights didn’t dim before the band made its way out on to the ancillary stage with little fanfare – other than Patti Smith’s "People Have the Power," which served as walk-up music. There was no Stravinsky overture, no fog machine, no moody lighting. In fact, it took a moment for many to realize the show was even starting.

When opening the second part of the concert – after an intermission that featured the recording of "The Wanderer" with Johnny Cash from the "Zooropa" LP – the band began playing the as-yet unrel…

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