Advertise on OnMilwaukee.com
"The future can change.  But until then, blacks and baseball just ain't a good match anymore," says Chris Rock.
"The future can change. But until then, blacks and baseball just ain't a good match anymore," says Chris Rock. (Photo: shutterstock.com)

Black, white, baseball and Chris Rock

I’m far from a baseball expert, but I am a fan of the Brewers.  Although, until basketball season ends I really don’t pay much attention beyond Opening Day. 

Chris Rock is a big Mets fan and his thoughts on the game of baseball are entertaining and fairly spot-on.  He shared them recently on one of my favorite shows, HBO’s "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel." 

Baseball, for many, seems to be stuck in the past.  It’s slow, tied needlessly to endless nostalgia and for many fans more about brats and beer than base hits.  Not that there’s anything wrong with that.  It’s actually what I really love about going to games. 

We are blessed in Wisconsin to have an amazing venue in Miller Park.  It truly makes baseball more fun. 

But, as Rock says, the sport could use some updating, hipness and, yes, additional diversity. As he pointed out, "It’s the only sport where there’s a ‘right way to play the game’ — and it’s ‘the white way.  The way it was played 100 years ago, when only whites were allowed to play."

See his full comments here. 

Warning, it’s Chris Rock, so there’s adult language.

Every episode has been funny, well-acted and just - at the risk of sounding corny - delightful.
Every episode has been funny, well-acted and just - at the risk of sounding corny - delightful. (Photo: Amazon Video)

Get to know Gortimer Gibbon

I love what’s happening on "TV" today.  "TV" is all about Netflix, HBO, Amazon, YouTube, Hulu, Crackle and the other seemingly hundreds of new content creators and streamers that are making traditional TV even more irrelevant in my life. 

So, when we wanted a new family show to watch this past weekend I did some searching and reading on Twitter, and found the Amazon Original Series "Gortimer Gibbon’s Life on Normal Street."

Face it, kids programming generally sucks.  My 7 year-old has a few decent shows we let him watch.  "Odd Squad" on PBS and the new Netflix rendition of "Inspector Gadget" are the two on his watch list now.  But, as I said, we wanted something new and good to watch.  And, we found it in "Gortimer."

Simply put, you need to meet this kid and his friends. It’s a great show and so far above the fray of your typical kids show that no matter your age you’ll truly enjoy it. 

Gortimer and his two best friends, Ranger and Mel, hang out in and around Normal Street – an ordinary neighborhood that has a hint of something magical.  We’re three episodes in, and every episode has been funny, well-acted and just – at the risk of sounding corny – delightful.

I don’t waste my time watching crap, it’s just not enjoyable to me.  So, meeting Goritmer and his friends has been a real treat.  I suggest you take a walk on Normal Street soon, too.

It’s free to stream if you have an Amazon Prime membership.

Read more...
Neil Diamond at the BMO Harris Bradley Center in Milwaukee.
Neil Diamond at the BMO Harris Bradley Center in Milwaukee. (Photo: milwaukeeoldies.com)

5 things my friend Frost learned at last night's Neil Diamond show

Frost Williams from VISIT Milwaukee went to last night's Neil Diamond concert at the BMO Harris Bradley Center. 

Here are five observations from the show, in his words, and a full list set.

1.Nostalgic or not, Neil Diamond is pure Americana (no pun intended).  From his songs about growing up in New York with "Brooklyn Roads" to the anthem "America," there are very few singer/songwriters that stand up to his discography. Even without "Kentucky Woman," "Longfellow Serenade," "Hello again" and "Shilo" on Thursday night, the 25 songs performed in the hour and 50 minute set were very memorable.

2. Neil is a crowd pleaser.  He released a new album in 2014 "Melody Road" that certainly spurred this tour.  And, he performed three songs from this album, "Nothing but a Heartache," "In Better Days" and "The Art of Love."  Each of them were enjoyable, but certainly not as known as his long songbook of hits that he performed.  The list, of course, included the highly singable "Heartlight" and "Sweet Caroline."

3. He's truly generational.  It was not a "Hot, August Night" like three of his live recordings have documented, but more a dreary, rainy spring night in Milwaukee. With that said, a large audience certainly came out for Neil. He kept thanking Wisconsin, not just Milwaukee as last night's crowd came from all over the region. The BMO Harris Bradley Center was over 90 percent full (by my eye) and with an average age of 45+, dare I say 50.  Looking around my immediate area in the lower bowl, it was magical to see an older generation singing, smiling and dancing with a performer that has endeared himself to so many in all generations. It is wonderful to know that he very well could next perform in a new Arena in three years.

4. He's a pop culture icon for decades. He truly peaked in the 70s as a solo artist but his hits from "I’m a Believer" to "Girl, You’ll be a Woman Soon" have spanned some 50 years of pop culture lexicon. Neil Diamond also has been covered by so m…

Read more...
Beer, brats and underground ramen in The Washington Post.
Beer, brats and underground ramen in The Washington Post. (Photo: Molly Snyder )

Washington Post toasts Milwaukee "beyond the beer and brats"

I've often said that beer and brats are, today, a great (and important) side dish to everything else we have in greater Milwaukee.  So, it's nice to see The Washington Post and Chicago journalist,  Guidebook author and traveler Kate Silver agree.

Yesterday's Travel Section on Washingtonpost.com includes a feature story titled "Venturing beyond the beer and brats in Milwaukee."  It toasts ramen at Ardent, the Frank Lloyd Wright homes in the area, Leon's Frozen Custard, Sobelman's and more.

Katy Deardorff, Communications Manager at VISIT Milwaukee worked with the writer to develop this story this winter.

Read the full story here.