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White tequila comes right from the distillery, whereas gold tequila is aged in oak.
White tequila comes right from the distillery, whereas gold tequila is aged in oak.

White tequila = my new amigo

"Bar Month" at OnMilwaukee.com is back for another round! The whole month of February, we're serving up intoxicatingly fun articles on bars and clubs -- including guides, the latest trends, rapid bar reviews and more. Grab a designated driver and dive in!

After a couple of bad experiences, I swore off tequila unless it was mixed into a margarita. I thought tequila made me too mouthy and extremely hungover. Recently, my friend Holly introduced me to white tequila, and I realized the Mexican potent potable could go back on my personal drink menu.

(And actually, the night I tried a shot of white tequila for the first time, it led me to do a body shot for the first time, too. Probably shouldn’t have agreed to the third shot. Note to self.)

While tequila is simply unaged, uncolored tequila. Most of the high-end tequilas have "100 percent blue agave" embossed on the bottle. Patron, for example, is one of the most popular 100-percent blue agave white tequilas and my personal favorite.

For the love of extraneous information, might I add that tequila comes from the distillation of the blue agave cactus grown in the town of Tequila -- and surrounding areas -- in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. The red volcanic soil in that area is ideal for the cacti to grow.

So, if you have sworn off tequila, you might want to give white tequila a whirl. Order it as a shot next time someone offers to buy you one -- it's pricier than the gold tequilas -- and you might be amazed at how smooth it is, and how easily it goes down. Careful.

Stop in for a White Mexican or a Hot Tito or a Bloody Maria.
Stop in for a White Mexican or a Hot Tito or a Bloody Maria.

Rapid Review: Cafe CorazĂłn

"Bar Month" at OnMilwaukee.com is back for another round! The whole month of February, we're serving up intoxicatingly fun articles on bars and clubs -- including guides, the latest trends, rapid bar reviews and more. Grab a designated driver and dive in!

Cafe CorazĂłn
3129 N. Bremen St.
(414) 810-3941

Cafe CorazĂłn opened at the end of 2009, and already garnered a reputation as a cozy bar and restaurant with consistently good food and a creative drink menu.

Owners John Kelly, George Mireles and Wendy Mireles take turns behind the bar and are open to customer input for their ever-evolving list of beverages. Much of their menu is Latin inspired, but good ol’ American comfort food and drink is also available.

"There’s always something new," says Wendy.

What to order: Corazón’s drink menu includes 23 different bottled beers -- including $2 Coronitas -- along with five different Latin wines. Also, specialty drinks cost $5 or $7.

The $5 menu features the White Mexican, an amigo of the White Russian that’s made with vodka, Kahlua and homemade horchata, as well as a version of the Hot Toddy, called the Hot Tito, and the unique calimocho made with red wine and cola.

The $7 menu includes the bar’s signature margarita, made with Corazón tequila and freshly squeezed lime juice, along with the pinata, a mix of rum, banana liqueur, pineapple and orange juice, and the woo woo, which includes vodka, peach schnapps and cranberry juice.

Prices: Affordable.

When to go: Whether customers stop in for dinner, brunch (Saturday and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.) or a Sunday football game, the drinks flow freely and the vibe is friendly. CorazĂłn is open everyday from 4 p.m. to midnight during the week and from 4 p.m. until bar time on weekends. The bar and restaurant is closed on Mondays.

Dress: Casual to fancy. Anything goes. It’s Riverwest.

Don't miss: The Bloody Maria features dilly beans from Wendy’s partially…

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Corkage fee or no corkage fee, bringing in wine shaves dollars off your bill.
Corkage fee or no corkage fee, bringing in wine shaves dollars off your bill.

Brew City's BYOB law needs refreshing

"Bar Month" at OnMilwaukee.com is back for another round! The whole month of February, we're serving up intoxicatingly fun articles on bars and clubs -- including guides, the latest trends, rapid bar reviews and more. Grab a designated driver and dive in!

Wisconsin state law prohibits bars and restaurants from allowing customers to bring in their own wine or beer. Next week on OnMilwaukee.com, local restaurateurs will weigh in on this issue and dish up the pros and cons of the law.

In the meantime, let's examine this issue.

Illinois does not have this law, and consequently, hundreds of Chicago restaurants allow diners to bring in a bottle of wine. Sometimes a "corkage fee" is charged, but sometimes not.

Personally, I believe that BYO-friendly restaurants would encourage people to dine out more often. In this economy, it seems like any incentive to seat people at tables is a good idea.

I mentioned this to a lawyer friend and jokingly asked her to change this law en pronto. She came back with a truthful response: that lawyers sometimes write the laws, but citizens actually change the laws.

So, what do you say, Milwaukee? Who's with me? Shall we band together and change this law? I’m thinking "WTF?" to Wisconsin’s ban on BYO.

"Sometimes I give money to strangers and sometimes I don't" is not an easy concept for a 6-year-old to grasp. But it's the truth.
"Sometimes I give money to strangers and sometimes I don't" is not an easy concept for a 6-year-old to grasp. But it's the truth.

Panhandling is a complicated issue for this parent

These days, my kids notice everything. And ask about everything. I admit, much of the time, they ask me a question that -- because my memory of seventh grade science class isn’t so sharp -- I say, "Let’s Google it." But sometimes, unfortunately, not even "The Google" can answer their inquiries.

Such is the case with their ongoing interest in panhandlers. We encounter them weekly, sometimes more, and it always inspires conversation that, quite frankly, I can’t answer in a cut-and-dried fashion.

The truth is, sometimes I give a dollar to panhandlers, sometimes I offer food (if I am approached in a grocery store parking lot) and sometimes -- for the love of Nancy Reagan -- I just say "no." Really, it depends on my mood, on the way I’m approached and whether or not I truly have money in my pocket.

"Why didn’t you give that man any money?" My kid asked yesterday after we were asked for cash for gas in a Capitol Drive parking lot.

"Because he was rude," I said.

"So you only give money to people who are nice?" he asks.

Crap. I have no idea how to answer this. Google, wanna weigh in?

I really can’t say that I always give money to "nice" people. I remember an instance this summer, when a seemingly nice woman asked me for money on Brady Street, and I said no, simply because I was feel strapped for cash myself.

"Sometimes I say yes and sometimes I say no," I finally tell my son.

I find panhandling a very complex issue, one that really can’t be explained to 6-year-olds. However, I am introducing them to another aspect of life: The reality that most things are not black-and-white, rather a slippery shade of gray, a color most of us cannot see until we are well into adulthood.

I hope they get this more quickly than I did.

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