Advertise on OnMilwaukee.com
"Where Did I Come From?" by Peter Mayle was published in 1977.
"Where Did I Come From?" by Peter Mayle was published in 1977.

Remember this book about the birds 'n' the bees?

March may be cold, but it's hot and heavy here at OnMilwaukee.com as we celebrate our first-ever Sex Week. We're taking a mature look at local video and sex toy shops, area strip clubs, sexy Milwaukee events -- and even some connections between Brew City and Playboy magazine. It's serious, responsible, adult-themed content -- but don’t worry, parents, we’ll keep it PG-13 in case junior stumbles upon these stories as OnMilwaukee.com turns a pale shade of blue for seven days.

Earlier this week, the OnMilwaukee.com Parent Posse weighed in on their thoughts about talking about sex with children. As my sons get older, and start asking more and more questions, I am preparing for the Big Talk.

I started researching kids' books about sex, thinking maybe a visual aid or two will be helpful when the time comes. A friend recommended "Being Born" by Sheila Kitzinger, which provides amazing photos of an embryo growing inside the womb.

Also, I came across the book "Where Did I Come From?" by Peter Mayle, best known for his book, "A Year in Provence." I remembered reading this book as a kid, and was surprised to see it was still, after all these years, considered to be a top choice by many parents and educators.

I requested this book from the library, and plan to screen it as a possible book to share with my kids someday. I am looking forward to seeing it, because I still remember some of the cartoon-ish drawings in the book that, if memory serves, add a lightness to the potentially heavy subject.

Constance Money plays a hooker named Misty.
Constance Money plays a hooker named Misty.

Sex Week cinema: "The Opening of Misty Beethoven"

March may be cold, but it's hot and heavy here at OnMilwaukee.com as we celebrate our first-ever Sex Week. We're taking a mature look at local video and sex toy shops, area strip clubs, sexy Milwaukee events -- and even some connections between Brew City and Playboy magazine. It's serious, responsible, adult-themed content -- but don't worry, parents, we'll keep it PG-13 in case junior stumbles upon these stories as OnMilwaukee.com turns a pale shade of blue for seven days.

When I received this assignment -- to write a blog about my favorite sexy movie -- I decided it was time to review some new porn and perhaps find a new fave.

After Googling around a bit, I decided to get the advice of an expert, so I called the erotic shop A Woman’s Touch and spoke to "pleasure specialist" Emily Jansen.

I asked Jansen to recommend sexy films, and she readily made a few suggestions. Her first suggestion was the Comstock Film series, which features real couples -- both gay and straight -- discussing their relationship followed by a sex scene.

She also suggested the Chemistry series, which takes the reality TV concept to the adult entertainment world. In this series, adult film stars meet in a house filled with sex toys and spend 36 hours exploring all of their sexual options.

However, I decided to check out her final suggestion, "The Opening of Misty Beethoven." Jansen described it as a "classic remake of ‘My Fair Lady’," which piqued my interest. I also read it was pornography meets "Pygmalion," and I was sold.

The film, released in 1975, is about a sexologist (Jamie Gillis) who attempts to transform a hooker, Misty (Constance Money), into the role of a sex goddess who spreads passion to a variety people. The film has more plot than most pornos, and the comedic writing is actually successful at times.

"The Opening of Misty Beethoven" was  the first pornographic film to feature a woman dominating a man with the help of a sex toy. …

Read more...
Brad? Angelina? Jessica? Carmen? Justin? Taye?
Brad? Angelina? Jessica? Carmen? Justin? Taye?

Who's your celebrity "freebie?"

March may be cold, but it's hot and heavy here at OnMilwaukee.com as we celebrate our first-ever Sex Week. We're taking a mature look at local video and sex toy shops, area strip clubs, sexy Milwaukee events -- and even some connections between Brew City and Playboy magazine. It's serious, responsible, adult-themed content -- but don’t worry, parents, we’ll keep it PG-13 in case junior stumbles upon these stories as OnMilwaukee.com turns a pale shade of blue for seven days.

In an ancient episode of "Friends," Ross  makes a "freebie list" of celebrities he would like to have his girlfriend Rachel’s blessing to have sex with if the unlikely opportunity presented itself.

This semi-famous episode prompted couples over the last decade to make similar lists. For the most part, the lists are made jokingly, however, if the opportunity really did arise, it would be fascinating to see what happened.

Spouse 1: You’re not going to believe this, honey, but I ran into Natalie Portman at karaoke last night and we really hit it off and she mentioned she’d like to have sex with me.
Spouse 2: Well, dear, I’m gonna have to say "go for it" considering she’s on the top of your freebie list. Which reminds me, I just added Danny Gokey to mine.

My husband and I made a list like this over cocktails many years ago, and topping the list for both of us was punk / folk musician Ani DiFranco. If memory serves, I think I also listed Johnny Depp, James Spader (not the modern day, puffy Spader, but the "Sex, Lies and Videotape" version of Spader) and rocker Lenny Kravitz.

How about you? If you could have a celebrity "freebie," who would it be?

Today, let's be silly. There's plenty of time for seriousness in life's next chapter.
Today, let's be silly. There's plenty of time for seriousness in life's next chapter.

Dr. Seuss: A pop I can hop to

Today, as you may have gleaned already, would have been the 105th birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel, otherwise known as "Dr. Seuss."

I don’t think a single American makes it through childhood without hearing or seeing a Dr. Seuss creation. The man was a timeless genius who gave us gems like "The Cat and the Hat," "Green Eggs and Ham," "The Lorax" and "One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish."

In the world of children’s’ literature, Seuss was the whole enchilada, combining skilled drawings with comical verse written in a poetic meter commonly used by English writers.

But best of all, Seuss was committed to the imagination first and the moral of the story second -- if at all. "Kids can see a moral coming a mile off," he said once. Although his books were laden with his political views, they weren’t obvious to the reader and he never started a story with a moral in mind.

His stories were simple, silly and rooted in the imagination -- like most of childhood should be.

I want to remember this when I wonder if my kid is reading well enough for his age or cramping his schedule with another lesson. After all, our little people are really lucky if they aren’t forced to get serious too soon, and silly can be stimulating.

"Nonsense wakes up the brain cells," said the great Seuss.