By Lori Fredrich Senior Writer & Dining Editor Published May 28, 2018 at 11:01 AM

Tuesday, May 29, is the day. The Shorewood location for Blue’s Egg officially opens to the public at 7 a.m. tomorrow at 4195 N. Oakland Ave.

Despite being operated by Black Shoe Hospitality, Shorewood Blue’s Egg has a slightly different ownership structure from the group’s other restaurants, which include Maxie’s and Story Hill BKC. Longtime managers Amy & Jason Kerstein, Black Shoe’s Administrative Czar and Director of Operations (respectively) are joint owners in the restaurant along with Dan Sidner and Chef Joe Muench.

Fans of Blue’s Egg will find the new location brighter, thanks to the large windows spanning both the North and East of the building. The ceilings are also higher, giving the dining room an airy feel.

Despite its modern digs, Blue’s Egg has a bit of a retro feel, with muted yellow walls, blue accents and a variety of art, including an Art Deco mural based on a   print from local artist Liz Carver, co-owner of Third Coast Paper.  The print, which pays homage to the Milwaukee Gas Light Building, includes the classic rhyme: "When the flame is red, it's warm weather ahead! When the flame is gold, watch out for cold! When the flame is blue, there's no change in view! When there's a flickering flame, expect snow or rain!"

As for its size, the restaurant’s capacity is similar to Blue’s Egg on the West Side, seating about 120 guests at both dining tables and the bar.

That’s partially thanks to the addition of an atrium, which runs along the north side of the restaurant and sports garage-door-like windows which can be opened to provide a breezy dining experience on warm days.

When it comes to the food, the Shorewood location boasts the same innovative, comfort-filled menu as the Wauwatosa location, which sports breakfast and brunch basics like eggs, toast and hash browns, buttermilk pancakes and French toast ($8.95) along with a collection of creatively filled omelettes ($12.50 with toast and a side), and sweet items like blueberry pancakes and lemon cheesecake French toast with lemon curd, white chocolate cream cheese, blackberries, house granola, whipped cream, blackberries and the choice of bacon or sausage ($12.50).

The menu also includes one new item: a beef cheek Benedict featuring poached eggs, braised beef cheeks, arugula, cheddar buttermilk biscuits and choron sauce, a variation of hollandaise made by blending tomato purée with béarnaise ($12.95 with one side).

Pair that with a cup of coffee, a mocha, a latte, or any number of house cocktails including the mimosa or beer-mosa ($6/$7.50), a "Morning-Groni" with gin, Campari, grapefruit juice and sweet vermouth over ice, or Blue’s bloody mary with Black Dot vodka, tomato juice, house blend spices, bacon garnish and a Miller High Life chaser ($9).

Among other plates are the eminent very stuffed browns featuring crispy hash browns with pulled ham and cheddar; aged provolone, basil pesto and tomato sauce; goat cheese, roasted olives and paprika aioli; chicken chorizo with spinach and paprika aioli; and roasted mushrooms with creamy leeks and herbed creme fraiche for $6.95.

Undecided? Flip over to the "Much Loved" section which lists favorites like Hoppel Poppel ($12.50), the crispy blue crab cake with mixed greens, challah toast, poached eggs, pickled peppers and remoulade ($13.95), housemade corned beef hash ($13.50) and steak and eggs with herb butter, toast and browns ($15.50).

Beginning at 11 a.m., folks also have the choice of a variety of lunch items including sandwiches (priced $9.95 to $13.95), soups and salads. For additional information as well as a full menu, visit bluesegg.com.

Blue’s Egg Shorewood will be open daily from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. The restaurant is also available to be rented for private parties and events in the evening.

Lori Fredrich Senior Writer & Dining Editor

Lori is an avid cook whose accrual of condiments and spices is rivaled only by her cookbook collection. Her passion for the culinary industry was birthed while balancing A&W root beer mugs as a teenage carhop, fed by insatiable curiosity and fueled by the people whose stories entwine with each and every dish. She’s had the privilege of chronicling these tales via numerous media, including OnMilwaukee and in her book “Milwaukee Food.” Her work has garnered journalism awards from entities including the Milwaukee Press Club. 

When she’s not eating, photographing food, writing or recording the FoodCrush podcast, you’ll find Lori seeking out adventures with her husband Paul, traveling, cooking, reading, learning, snuggling with her cats and looking for ways to make a difference.