Advertise on OnMilwaukee.com
More than 100 kids at Browning School got eye exams thanks to Clear Days Ahead. Many - including some who are legally blind - received free eyeglasses.
More than 100 kids at Browning School got eye exams thanks to Clear Days Ahead. Many - including some who are legally blind - received free eyeglasses. (Photo: Joe Brusky/MTEA)

These 6 photos of MPS kids getting free glasses will make your day

Because who couldn’t use a smile, here are six irresistible images of kids at Milwaukee Public Schools’ Browning Community School, 5440 N. 64th St., getting free eye tests and glasses thanks to a partnership between Wisconsin Vision, the Milwaukee Teachers' Education Association, Milwaukee Public Schools, and Prevent Blindness Wisconsin.

Via a program called Clear Days Ahead, optometrists, opticians and volunteers provided eye exams to more than 100 kids at Browning and another nearly 100 at Barack Obama School of Career and Technical Education late last autumn, and MTEA lensman Joe Brusky was there to capture it in pixels. Kids determined to need glasses got them for free, thanks to Wisconsin Vision.

"Undetected vision problems make learning difficult and stressful on students," said Milwaukee Teachers' Education Association President Kim Schroeder. "Vision can affect a student's attention span, reading comprehension and mood."

The Clear Days Ahead partnership began in 2010 and since then more than 800 pairs of glasses have been given to MPS students. According to Wisconsin Visions’ Beth Bush, every year the program has identified – and given glasses to – kids who are legally blind.

Watch a video and learn more about the program here.

"We want our young people to have all the tools they need to be in school, every day, ready to learn," said Dr. Darienne Driver, MPS Superintendent. "We want to thank Wisconsin Vision and the MTEA for their work to ensure our students can see and actively participate in their classes."

If that’s not enough to make you smile, look at these photos:

If you want to see more photos, click here and here.

Read more...
Six MPS students will compete in an ice cream contest - with Ben & Jerry's Jerry as a judge.
Six MPS students will compete in an ice cream contest - with Ben & Jerry's Jerry as a judge. (Photo: Milwaukee Public Schools)

Ben & Jerry's joins MPS and Bartolotta's for ice cream contest

This morning, Milwaukee Public Schools announced an ice cream making contest in collaboration with the Bartolotta Restaurant Group, with which it has a shared culinary arts partnership.

Ben & Jerr's co-founder Jerry Greenfield will be one of four judges in the competition, slated for Friday, Jan. 20 at James Madison Academic Campus, located at 8135 W. Florist Ave., from noon until 3 p.m.

The other judges are MPS Superintendent Dr. Darienne Driver, Bartolotta's Jennifer Bartolotta and Madison principal Gregory Ogunbowale.

The fun and educational competition is part of ProStart, a culinary arts program implemented with Bartolotta Restaurant Group in four MPS high schools – Bay View, James Madison, Vincent and Washington – to help provide students with career readiness skills they can apply in jobs in the restaurant and hospitality industries.

Six ProStart high school students will take part in the contest, in which each will have to create and submit two unique ice creams that will be judged on their texture, flavor, creativity and presentation, according to an MPS news release.

The winners' flavors will then be featured on the menu at Bartolotta's Osgood's restaurant in the Mayfair Collection in Wauwatosa – a venue that typically serves frozen custard; just sayin' – in February.

"Through continued partnerships with successful businessmen like Jerry, we are thrilled to continue to teach our young adults in the ProStart program all of the opportunity that lies before them if they want to make hospitality a career," said Bartolotta in the news release today.

MAM is slated to get more than 500 posters created by the "father of the modern poster," Jules Chéret.
MAM is slated to get more than 500 posters created by the "father of the modern poster," Jules Chéret. (Photo: Milwaukee Art Museum)

Couple's promise to MAM: 500 French posters and a new assistant curator

The Milwaukee Art Museum has announced that by Milwaukeeans Susee and James Wiechmann have promised a gift to the museum of more than 500 posters by French graphic artist Jules Chéret, boosting the MAM’s already extensive collection of works on paper.

The gift also includes funding for a new position – associate curator of prints and drawings – which will be filled in February by Britany L. Salsbury, who comes to Milwaukee from the Rhode Island School of Design’s Museum of Art.

Anyone who has seen the classic French posters of the late 19th century will recognize Chéret’s flamboyant, high-kicking, colorful style. Working during the same era as Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Pierre Bonnard – whose work he inspired – Chéret has been called the father of the modern poster.

A statement from the museum says "this unparalleled group of more than 500 Chéret artworks" is "one of the largest and most comprehensive of its kind (and) encompasses the full range of Chéret’s innovative output from his bold, expressive posters advertising theatrical events, social gatherings and a myriad of products; to designs for book covers and menus; to intimate lithographic studies of his models."

Some of the works were seen in the museum’s popular 2012 exhibition, "Posters of Paris: Toulouse-Lautrec and His Contemporaries," which helped make that year one of the most-attended in MAM’s history to that point.

"Susee and I are thrilled to add our Jules Chéret poster collection to the Museum’s treasures where it can be shared by all," said James Wiechmann in a statement. "These posters that lit up the streets of Paris in the late 1800s will now shine in the galleries of our Milwaukee Art Museum and those of other Museums as they are exhibited around the country."

Added Marcelle Polednik, Ph.D., Donna and Donald Baumgartner director:

"The Milwaukee Art Museum is thrilled about this extraordinary gift. It raises our standing both nationally and internationally, an…

Read more...
The landmark Garfield Avenue School was built in 1887 to designs by architect Henry C. Koch.
The landmark Garfield Avenue School was built in 1887 to designs by architect Henry C. Koch.

Completion of Garfield Avenue School sale pushes Bronzeville project forward

This morning, the City of Milwaukee’s Bronzeville Advisory Committee offered an update on the project on 4th St. and North Ave. that would convert the former Garfield Avenue School and America’s Black Holocaust Museum buildings into a mixed-use development.

Last year, the Common Council approved a plan by Maures Development Group to redevelop a set of buildings, including the Henry Koch-designed former Garfield Avenue School, 2215 N. 4th St., into mixed-income housing, a new America's Black Holocaust Museum and more in Bronzeville.

The plan received Low Income Housing Tax Credits last year and the committee announced this morning that the sale of the former school has been completed.

"It’s a great accomplishment," said committee vice-chair Rhonda Manuel. "It’s the first step toward completing this historic project."

Manuel added that the next move is to close on the low-slung building just northeast of the school that had long housed the late James Cameron’s America’s Black Holocaust Museum. At that point, Manuel said, a groundbreaking ceremony can be organized.

Committee member Jayme Montgomery Baker said that a planned tour of the school for a group of individuals involved in the project was delayed until after the closing on the school deal and is now expected to take place in February.

"It’s been a long wait for this catalytic project," said committee chair Ralph Hollmon, "but things are beginning to take shape, and that’s very exciting."

See inside the former school here and here.

Read more...